Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
Great Brined Brisket Recipe Login/Join
 
posted
Obtain a packer cut brisket (at least 12 pounds) from a quality source, unwrap it, rinse it off under cold water, and refrigerate it while you prepare your brisket brine. I used one gallon of pure apple juice, one gallon of regular ginger ale, two cups of kosher salt, two cups of dark brown sugar, and one quarter cup of Gaylord Hauser's SPIKE SEASONING (available @ Whole Foods Market, Shaw's Supermarket). Put the brisket in a heavy plastic bag large enough to allow the brisket to be completely immersed in the brine. (I like to use the black heavy duty contractor bags that you see at Lowe's and Home Depot.) Refrigerate the brisket for 48 hours. (I brine it for two days because brisket is such a tough cut of meat and 48 hours allows the brine to thoroughly permeate the meat.) I didn't want to tie up my refrigerator for two days so I used a circular 10 gallon Igloo water cooler. Just add ice from the top and drain off the water from the bottom. After 48 hours remove the brisket the brine and let it drain for a few minutes. Rub the brisket down with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle it with a quarter cup of SPIKE SEASONING, thoroughly massaging the rup into every nook and cranny of the brisket. Wrap the brisket up in plastic and enclose in a waterproof container (heavy duty contractor bags work just fine). Refrigerate the brisket for another 48 hours. I use a Cookshack AMERIQUE smoker set at 225 degrees with my meat probe temperature set at 180 degrees. The last brisket that I smoked smoked weighed 11.8 pounds and took 11 hours, 15 minutes to reach an internal temperature of 180 degrees. This brisket made eveyone who tasted it think that they were in BBQ HEAVEN. The only problem was that I don't have any brisket left so Next time I'll just have to smoke two, or more.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Boston, Massachusetts | Registered: October 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"If you can't smoke it, you probably shouldn't eat it!"
posted Hide Post
This sounds interesting.
Welcome to the fourm.
I only have 3 questions.

1 Is a contractor garbage bag food safe and/or safe to brine in?

2 Wouldn’t you be better off using a 2 1/2 gallon zip lock to brine in?

3 Got any pictures?


Happy AmeriQue and SM260 owner
 
Posts: 610 | Location: West Liberty, Iowa | Registered: February 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Glad you have had a good experience with a medium term brine.
Many folks pass on brining beef,as they find little to be gained-except the corned beef/pastrami folks.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9824 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
I make sure that the contractor bags are from a new box which I keep just for this purpose. These bags are not sold as a food safe item. i have never encountered a problem in the years that I've been using them. I don't think a 12 pound brisket will fit into a 2.5 gallon zip lock bag. If zip lock bags were available in oversizes that would be a perfect solution. The ideal container would be a sterile, waterproof container just large enough to hold the brisket(s) and brine and fit into the refrigerator/cooler. I don't have any pictures but the brisket had a nice dark brown color and had lost about 20% of its uncooked weight.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Boston, Massachusetts | Registered: October 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post

posted Hide Post
I brine large items in an approriate-size cooler. I use bags of ice cubes to hold the item under the surface of the brine and turn the item over a few times during the brining process to make sure the item is evenly brined.

I recall that I saw this method on The Food Network show "Good Eats" so I can't take credit for it.

Saves lots of room in the fridge for other meal items, too. The downside is that it probably takes more brine than if I used a large bag.

I don't know that I would use a non-food safe garbage bag for a food item, however...eating lots of smoked meats can't be all that good for you in the long run and probably most of us are carrying around extra pounds that aren't good for us either.


"Live life while you are alive, because when you're dead, you're dead a long time"-Roland Michael Curtis
 
Posts: 867 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: June 14, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Tom, this brisket doesn't taste even remotely like corned beef or pastrami. I believe that the apple juice and gingerale work together with the SPIKE SEASONING to create a very different and unique flavor and tenderness. I used one ounce hickory, one ounce of maple, and one ounce of apple for this brisket smoke. The meat was as tender and flavorable as any prime steak or roast that I've ever eaten.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Boston, Massachusetts | Registered: October 31, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"If you can't smoke it, you probably shouldn't eat it!"
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Jeffrey Yates:
I make sure that the contractor bags are from a new box which I keep just for this purpose. These bags are not sold as a food safe item. i have never encountered a problem in the years that I've been using them. I don't think a 12 pound brisket will fit into a 2.5 gallon zip lock bag. If zip lock bags were available in oversizes that would be a perfect solution. The ideal container would be a sterile, waterproof container just large enough to hold the brisket(s) and brine and fit into the refrigerator/cooler. I don't have any pictures but the brisket had a nice dark brown color and had lost about 20% of its uncooked weight.


I regularly put 12-16 lb briskets in 2 1/2 gallon zip locks after rubbing them. You just have to fold them over.

Next time take pictures. I’d like to see the finished product. It’s all good


Happy AmeriQue and SM260 owner
 
Posts: 610 | Location: West Liberty, Iowa | Registered: February 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posted Hide Post
Like Arnie says.Comp cooks may trim all their meats at home,before road trips,and large packers fit fine in the 2.5 gal ziplocs.The meat inspector can handle them easily,also.

Michael,if the cook suits your needs and taste that is the important thing.

Many folks would find the expense of the brine and the amount of time in the process to be prohibitive,especially if cooking several and at different times of the week.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9824 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata  
 


Copyright Cookshack, Inc. 2001 - 2011