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Boneless cushion roast vs PB Login/Join
 
posted
Which is better for pulled pork - boneless cushion meat or pork butt and why?
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Gainesville, FL | Registered: May 28, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I would think that a PB is what you would want to use for pulled pork. It has plenty of internal fat that will produce moist meat, along with different muscles that will produce a nice variety of pulled pork.

As far as the cushion roast, I had to look it up and see what it looked like, and it really looks rather lean. I wouldn't want to make pulled pork, it would just be too dry.


difference in the two
 
Posts: 2890 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The cushion meat was recommended but I wanted to get feedback from a few cooks on the forum. Do you suggest boneless or shank PB?

Thank you for the input.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Gainesville, FL | Registered: May 28, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Cal's making sense. I prefer bone in. For $16 try the cushion meat just to see how it turns out. Who recommended the cushion meat? If one of the experienced cooks on this forum said to try it for a change, I'd do it.
 
Posts: 4832 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've never heard of pork cushion. Did a Google and came across this post from a butchers forum:

The "cushion" comes from the Pork Shoulder Picnic (or Arm), The picnic shoulder is more economical than the Boston Butt, but also contains more fat than the blade shoulder. When the bone and fat is trimmed from this cut it results in a very rich flavored roast. The meat from this cut is excellent for making juicy barbecued pulled pork. The Picnic has a large bone and joint that runs through the middle of the roast, one side has a large lean muscle...that is the "cushion". You can also slice and pound them for pork cutlets, stew meat, etc and use them in any chicken recipe.

Several other Google hits mentioned using the cushion for pulled pork...one of which suggested a brine/marinade prior to smoking.

LLC are you up for a challenge? Try smoking cushion meat and let us know the results.
 
Posts: 2412 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I spoke with a local butcher on Tuesday, 12 July and he was not familiar with cushion meat. I will try to find a local source of cushion pork and try it.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Gainesville, FL | Registered: May 28, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think i saw this cushion meat at restaurant depot . im learning these cuts one at a time from rd cause you dont hardly ever see them at the grocery . rd has cuts i never saw anywhere else
 
Posts: 197 | Registered: March 11, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I met with a cold storage facility that has been in business for 80 years today that specializes in pork sausage. They can order the meat in 30 or 60 lb increments. We are making progress.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Gainesville, FL | Registered: May 28, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cushion does just fine for pulled pork. The cushion from RD is generally 4 pieces - so more potential bark - and quicker smoke time.
 
Posts: 11 | Registered: February 20, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm no expert,but have seen it in some chains in FL.If it is less cost per serving,you can buy/serve it.The Canadians here are used to it.The places that serve sliced pork feel that rather than breaking down the shoulder to get a "loin like" roast and disposing the fat,the yield is a little better to just buy these boneless and slice them.

The chains in FL for many years sold kinda thick sliced pork with a loin roast appearance.

When the chain that has Red Lobster,Olive Garden,etc[Darden] opened Smokey Bones Barbecue group they served pulled pork,brisket ,and cold beer which changed the market here.

The reps that sold large "gassers", like Southern Prides, recommended cooking pork to a little over 175º[-increases yield ] and boneless meat [less labor].The pieces would slice to look like "loin" which is strong with Canadians. These fit that model.Distributors already buy a lot of cases.They slice thick,or thin.

They also recommended bottom round,instead of briskets for the same reasons.

Sorry if this rambles,but just passing on historical anecdotes.

The feeling would be"you can use them to replace butts,picnics,shoulders-if the price is right.

FL not really considered the South,which would know and historically prefer pork shoulders.

Hope this helps a little.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9882 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
"If you can't smoke it, you probably shouldn't eat it!"
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We do 300 lbs of cushion for pulled pork every year at our church fair stand during the county fair.

It is much more economical than Boston Butt, forgiving and very flavorful

If I’m doing pulled pork for family or friends I always do Boston Butt


Happy AmeriQue and SM260 owner
 
Posts: 610 | Location: West Liberty, Iowa | Registered: February 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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