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Bone in or boneless prime rib Login/Join
 
posted
Looking at doing prime rib for Xmas. I have read every post on PR including Prime Rib 101 (10 times). Here's the questions for discussion and help. I need to do a 20 pound PR. My thought is to do two 10 pounders so I have 4 end cuts for the weak at heart. Do you think I should go boneless, or bone in? If I go bone in, should I trim them off prior to cooking and string it back on for the cook, or trim the bones prior to slicing after it is cooked. My idea is its easier for portion control to remove the bones prior to slicing. The other thought is to start out boneless. I am just concerned about missing some flavor the bones might add. Cooking on an FEC 100. P.S. great job Smoking Oakie on the new PR 101.
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Aurora, Oregon | Registered: June 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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If it was me?

I'd go bone in on one and no bone on the other so you can compare.

A lot of people won't even know the difference. You gotta really have great taste buds to notice.

And I leave the bone on. I'm real good with a knife and just trim them off after it's cooked.

Read through the PR101 PDF about people who want "well done" I talk about heating up a MR cut in some Au Jus and it takes away the red. I leave the end pieces for ME, that's what I do, I love all that rub.

Do some slight things different between the two so you can get the benefit.

test your thermometers before you cook, again. I always do.

Good luck.

Russ
 
Posts: 14464 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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bone on or off is a personal preference. If it's easier for you to trim and tie then go for it. The bone on is more about presentation. The bone really doesn't add significant flavor since the meat is typically cooked to rare. I did a boneless last year that turned our great. Cooked it with CS set at 210 resulting in perfect rare with minimal over cooked edges.
 
Posts: 650 | Location: Shelbyville, TN | Registered: January 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I prefer the bone-in and trim after cooking. It is very easy to trim after cooking especially if the roasts are less than 6 bones.

I also prefer to sear in the begining as you are less likely to over shoot the temp while in the smoker or during the resting period. I don't like the meat temp to get past 132*.
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: January 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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Now slim jim, you're starting a controvery -- whether to sear first or sear after. They're all good actually, just a preference.

For me, searing first gives the PR that outer edge that's brown and overcooked. We've all seen it. Not right or wrong, but it's brown because of searing first.

Not sure what searing has to do in preventing overshooting in the smoker? can you clarify?
 
Posts: 14464 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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We're doing a prime rib for Christmas also. I have the butcher trim the bones and tie them. I then cut the string, apply rub to all sides of the meat and bones and retie. Sear afterwards. Works for me.
 
Posts: 4892 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've always seared first only because that's the way I learned. Have done both boneless and bone in. Both have come out super! I prefer the bone in because that way we get the beef rib to knaw on later. I have 2 daughters that love the bones as I do, so I always have to cook at least a 4 bone roast. The 4th bone, well you know who gets that one. The cook!
Life is good, enjoy all you can!
Merry Christmas!


GaryT
Pok N Da Ribs BBQ

FEC 100--PG500
 
Posts: 210 | Location: Wichita, Ks | Registered: July 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I used to sear first but changed it up to allow better smoke penetration. Thought the initial searing would prevent penetration based on some things I've read here.
 
Posts: 4892 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Pags:
I used to sear first but changed it up to allow better smoke penetration. Thought the initial searing would prevent penetration based on some things I've read here.

Pags
I'll try that. I have a roast ordered and plan to do it in the next few weeks.
Nice thing about trying new techniques is that you get to push the start button again.


GaryT
Pok N Da Ribs BBQ

FEC 100--PG500
 
Posts: 210 | Location: Wichita, Ks | Registered: July 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also do what Pags described! Have butcher tie bones back on,smoke then sear for a very short time. Seems to work for my family!!

Love the ends and the bones! Eeker

Doing 2, 4 bone prime ribs for Xmas.
 
Posts: 681 | Location: Shreveport, LA | Registered: April 26, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by SmokinOkie:
Now slim jim, you're starting a controvery -- whether to sear first or sear after. They're all good actually, just a preference.

For me, searing first gives the PR that outer edge that's brown and overcooked. We've all seen it. Not right or wrong, but it's brown because of searing first.

Not sure what searing has to do in preventing overshooting in the smoker? can you clarify?


I was just stating that when you sear at the end there is a greater risk of going past your pull temp while its still in the cooker or shooting past your desired serving temp while it's resting.

I have not had the problem of overcooking the outer edge, but my sear is only about 25 min at 425* (max temp of my FEC100).
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: January 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I can understand that. Much easier to hit your temp when cooking low and slow. Less carryover also. I preheat the oven to 500*, turn it off, put the PR in for 6-10 minutes after the smoke. Definitely keep an eye on it.
 
Posts: 4892 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you everyone for the help. Prime rib going in at 5AM for lunch for my small group at work. They are my official testers for my Q. This will be the pre Xmas test. You know, I think they really like the testing as none have missed a day at work since I starting bringing BBQ on random days every week.
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Aurora, Oregon | Registered: June 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Update on the PR. Smoked it just like PR101 and it came out perfect. Trimmed the bones out real close at the carving table ( I liked them first and then the dog got what was left) Best prime rib we had ever had. I love PR, and although this was the best ever, and I will now do it for the big Xmas dinner, I really feel that the ooh and aah factor of doing pork products, brisket and poultry is a lot greater when smoking is involved. THANKS AGAIN
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Aurora, Oregon | Registered: June 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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