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Good Cuts of Beef to Smoke? Login/Join
 
posted
Other than a brisket, what cuts of beef are good candiates for smoking?
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The shoulder/chuck cuts lend themselves to low and slow cooking.
 
Posts: 9929 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just smoked a chuck roll on Sunday night on my FEC and it came out great. It was an 18 lb. piece of meat and took about 12 hours to cook at 240. Please note that I wrapped it at 165 in order to maintain moisture.
 
Posts: 2102 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the input guys...I've seen several people talking about the 'chuck roll'....Is that the same thing as a chuck roast?
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The clods and rolls are what a meat dept used to get,to cut all their chuck products from.

Yes ,your smaller chuck roast,could be sectioned out of one.
 
Posts: 9929 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For something different, try smoking roast beef. Get a top round roast, or for smaller amounts, eye of round roasts.

These are lean with not much fat, so you don't cook them low and slow. Instead add your wood and crank the smoker to the highest setting and cook until they reach an internal temp that would be consistent with how you like steak (rare, medium, or well done), approx. 140-160* internal.

After you take it out and it cools, slice thinly (it's easier to slice thinly when the meat isn't hot), and use for sandwiches. I bet it'll be the best roast beef you ever had!
 
Posts: 161 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: March 25, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like beef ribs.....
 
Posts: 415 | Location: Los Angeles, CA | Registered: October 31, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know this is an old post but I had to answer. I've done three beef standing-rib roasts on my old water smoker and they were simply outstanding cooked to about 145-150. I've always bought them with bone in because I think the bone adds a lot of flavor and moisture. The last one I bought was from a good butcher who recommended letting him cut the meat free from the bone and then tying it back in place for cooking. That was great! Same flavor but it took two minutes to carve and serve. The recipe I used was from a book called "Smoke and Spice". If you smoke - you need it!

My new 009 arrives in three days. I'm counting the minutes.
 
Posts: 4 | Registered: May 25, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RibDog:
I just smoked a chuck roll on Sunday night on my FEC and it came out great. It was an 18 lb. piece of meat and took about 12 hours to cook at 240. Please note that I wrapped it at 165 in order to maintain moisture.

Ribdog,
What was the internal temp when you pulled it? Would it be good to go to thinnly slice???
 
Posts: 149 | Location: South Dakota | Registered: January 26, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Until Ribdog gets here,I think he pulls above 190*, for pulled beef.

You can get a little bit that is slicable,and most will pull or chop.

I wouldn't try to thin slice,at that high an internal.

More like mid 180*'s.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9929 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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190-195* should be fine. Being that it is wrapped and trapping all the juices, it does not seem to dry out in that temp range. But it sure is tasty! Have not done one for a while. Might have to after this post coming up.


John
 
Posts: 2102 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I recently did a top round small Angus roast. It was only 2.5 pounds and on sale for $1.99 a pound.
I cooked at 225F for 2.5 to 3 hours with an internal temp of 135F. It came out rare and tender with good smoke flavor. I think I would have brought the internal temp up a little more but she likes rare! I thin sliced it for dinner hot with a beef gravy. The gravy did not mask the smoke taste. The rest of it was thin sliced for sandwiches...very good!


Bad decisions usually make for good stories!
 
Posts: 20 | Location: CT & Florida | Registered: December 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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