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Hello- I am planning to purchase an electric smoker in the near future.. I have narrowed it down to a Cookshack Elite 45 or a           Smokin It 2D. I want something large enough to smoke 5 to 7 racks of ribs without having to cut them in half. I will also be smoking brisket and pork butts. The Cookshack 025 would probably work for me but I didn’t want to get something to small and regret it later. Temperature where I live usually falls into the 20’s so it will need to be able to hold temperature when it’s cold. Any advice would be appreciated.

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Ditto on dakotasmoke. I have never regretted the cost of my SM066 for one second. It can do 6 racks of ribs without even using the lowest rack, which I think is too close to the heat. I have used it for ribs at an outside temp of 25 degrees with wind - no problem, and I haven't had any display problems on my unit. I bought in 2013, if that has any usefulness. I do try to keep it from getting wet from rain, at least the control unit, but otherwise I am very happy with it. Brisket, pastrami, ribs (pork loin backs and beef short ribs), pork butt, lots and lots of salmon every summer, and chicken wings and turkey thighs. All is good and no worries about the smoker behavior at all. Just solid "set it and forget it." I should say that it lives in a non-heated garage when not in use.

Jdcellar posted:

Hello- I am planning to purchase an electric smoker in the near future.. I have narrowed it down to a Cookshack Elite 45 or a           Smokin It 2D. I want something large enough to smoke 5 to 7 racks of ribs without having to cut them in half. I will also be smoking brisket and pork butts. The Cookshack 025 would probably work for me but I didn’t want to get something to small and regret it later. Temperature where I live usually falls into the 20’s so it will need to be able to hold temperature when it’s cold. Any advice would be appreciated.

I started with the smallest cookshack smoker many years ago (do not remember the year) and  it served me well. I was living in the Chicago area at the time I had no problem smoking meats when the temps dropped below zero. I now use a FEC-100. If you are not competing  I recommend the SM066.

Jdcellar posted:

Hello- I am planning to purchase an electric smoker in the near future.. I have narrowed it down to a Cookshack Elite 45 or a           Smokin It 2D. I want something large enough to smoke 5 to 7 racks of ribs without having to cut them in half. I will also be smoking brisket and pork butts. The Cookshack 025 would probably work for me but I didn’t want to get something to small and regret it later. Temperature where I live usually falls into the 20’s so it will need to be able to hold temperature when it’s cold. Any advice would be appreciated.

If you are not sure about getting Cookshack 025, then you probably should have a look at bigger model if you have a budget. I have had the SM025 for several years. I currently really use it almost exclusively for jerky and cold smoking as it is pretty small. So I've kinds outgrown it pretty fast: family gatherings, big parties etc. Though, it's totally OK  for a small dinner party. You won't regret about the quality, and trust me - even in the small 008 smokette models a large brisket can be done.
It just takes some folding.

If you are looking for a quality American built oven you cannot go wrong with a Cookshack Smoker.Almost all the other smoker brands are foreign made. I replaced my Weber Smokey Mountain and bought the Cookshack  Smokette about 20 years ago. I decided I wanted something bigger and replaced it with the Fast Eddie pellet smoker about 5 years ago. I gave the Smokette to my daughter and it is still in service. Her husband is a firefighter and uses it when it is his time to cook for the crew. If you want a quality American built smoker I highly recommend any of the Cookshack smokers.

"Cookshack smokers' even and controllable heat makes a product that is smoky, moist, and tender — just what the judges are looking for — without the hassle and uncertain results obtained by traditional 'stick burner' pits." So that downtown faux-country hipster bar that just added barbecue to its menu? There's a reason it tastes no smokier than your bubbe's brisket.

I live in Idaho where it gets pretty cold.  I started out with an old SMO008, and out grew it fast.  I looked at SMO25, and decided on the SMO45.  I out grew it and got the SMO066.  I have cooked with all of these when they were covered with both snow and ice.  I finally built a cover for them.  The 025, 045, and 066 all use the same sized racks.  The good thing about all of them is they cook moist, and only use 2 to 8 ounces of wood.  I have cooked 3 packer briskets in the 045, and can easily get 5 packers in the 066.  Just a hint;  If you decide on a Cookshack, order it directly from them.  Call them and have them upgrade the racks to stainless steel, and the custom side racks.  The custom side racks will give you more slots to to add more racks.  This will be less expensive in the end. 

jay1924 posted:

Ok, Mike. I'm getting critical on needing new racks for my SM066 to replace the original chrome - they're all getting pitted and nasty and hard to clean. I guess I'm going for stainless, but man, the price is high. Oh well, it is CS. Maybe I'll start with 2 or 3 since that's all I typically use at once.

Jay 1924:  This why I tell people that are buying new to ask for the upgrade.  Much less expensive when you start out with the stainless.

 

Jay, for the SM045 I ordered it with the cart and the larger cover, so it should be well kept under my patio. Are there any other areas of concern with these units?  The Masterbuilt had numerous areas of concern, starting with the water pan that corroded out after about 2 years. In the end I could see the entire inside walls were corroding and finally the heat element shorted. Basically I think the Masterbuilt was a minifridge converted to be a smoker.

Flyingman:  I have been running these smokers for over 20 years.  I still have the SMO9 that I started with and it is still running strong.  I also have a SMO45, an SMO66, and a new PG 1000.  I always recommend that people order direct from Cookshack and have them upgrade the grills to Stainless Steel.  They are less expensive this way.  You might call cookshack and tell them that you didn't know this upgrade was available.  There are some differences in the cookshack and Masterbuilt.  First off you will not need to add a water pan.  These smokers cook very moist.  People that do jerky and sausage in them actually have to open the door several times during the cook just to dump moisture.  When you get your smoker look at the inside back wall.  You will see a small tube sticking out.  This is the thermostat for the smoker.  REMEMBER THIS.  you will want to clean it every so often.  You also do not want to load anything that you are smoking so that it is in contact with or close to the tube.  These smokers are very wood stingy.  4 to 6 Oz. of wood will be all you need.  The control unit has a preset start up cycle built in.  There isn't a way to over ride this default.  For the first 30 minutes or so your smoker will run on high.  This is to get the smoke rolling and smoker warmed up.  You may see temperatures above your set temp. during this time.  One other thing for you to do is do a search on this site for "Big Bang" and do some reading.

@idahomike posted:

Flyingman:  I have been running these smokers for over 20 years.  I still have the SMO9 that I started with and it is still running strong.  I also have a SMO45, an SMO66, and a new PG 1000.  I always recommend that people order direct from Cookshack and have them upgrade the grills to Stainless Steel.  They are less expensive this way.  You might call cookshack and tell them that you didn't know this upgrade was available.  There are some differences in the cookshack and Masterbuilt.  First off you will not need to add a water pan.  These smokers cook very moist.  People that do jerky and sausage in them actually have to open the door several times during the cook just to dump moisture.  When you get your smoker look at the inside back wall.  You will see a small tube sticking out.  This is the thermostat for the smoker.  REMEMBER THIS.  you will want to clean it every so often.  You also do not want to load anything that you are smoking so that it is in contact with or close to the tube.  These smokers are very wood stingy.  4 to 6 Oz. of wood will be all you need.  The control unit has a preset start up cycle built in.  There isn't a way to over ride this default.  For the first 30 minutes or so your smoker will run on high.  This is to get the smoke rolling and smoker warmed up.  You may see temperatures above your set temp. during this time.  One other thing for you to do is do a search on this site for "Big Bang" and do some reading.

Idahomike - I totally agree with what you said. I have been smoking meats for the past 40+ years. I replaced my Weber bullet smoker with the SM09. After using the SM09 for about 10 years I gave my it to my daughter and son-in-law about 7 years ago and they are still using it today. I replaced my SM09 with a FE100. The Cookshack line of smokers are built like tanks and I would not consider replacing my Cookshack with anything other than another Cookshack.

Idahomike, I actually placed my order through BBQGUYS site. Price was the same. Thanks for the tip nonetheless. I've found some great info here and a few video's posted on use of the SM045, clean up, etc... I'm actually still waiting to see what the ship date will be. They say it ships within 24 hours on their website but I ordered over the weekend.

Idahomike, I read about that "Big Bang". Sounds like it could be a bit dangerous. I assume the low input of oxygen with the accumulation of flammable gas from the wood smoldering reaching the band where the LEL and UEL could be satisfied. The wood serves as the ignition point, and you have just the right mixture of explosive gasses and air, and boom, "Big Bang". I've seen this happen on larger structures than these well built smokers, and the end results isn't always pretty, usually bulging of the compartment or complete destruction.  I'm thinking it is just due to how the wood is burning or not burning (releasing explosive gas) vs say accumulation of old grease and fat within the smoker.

Not too much different than that occasional blast you can get when lighting a gas grill or opening the gas valve on a burner and then it lights a bit later.

Interesting article here:

http://www.wermac.org/safety/s..._is_lel_and_uel.html

Last edited by Flyingman

Flyingman:  I was a Firefighter/EMT.  We called this "Big Bang" a smoke explosion.  They are closely related to a back draft.  When my SMO45 was new I had a big "Big Bang" on Thanksgiving morning.  That bang actually shook the house and had every dog in the neighborhood going nuts.  I figured I would have a round smoker full of turkey pieces parts.  I turned the smoker off and waited a little while before opening the door.  The turkey was fine.  I checked the smoker with a square and everything was nice and square.  I fired the smoker back up and we had a great thanksgiving.  I did keep a closer watch on the smoker for a while.  I did get to see the smoker do a couple of smaller bangs.  Just before the bang I watched the smoker "Breath".  The smoke would be rolling out of the vents and then the smoke would reverse stream and suck back into the smoker.  When the smoker got a big enough gulp of air it would bang.  All of this eventually went away as the smoker got well seasoned.

So I received my delivery notice. Two shipments will arrive tomorrow, the smoker and the cart. Gotta clear room in my patio! Have to decide what I'll smoke first, decisions, decisions. Probably go with a pork butt and some ribs. I'll leave the brisket for another time once I'm comfortable with how this CS runs. Ya'll been great on this forum!

Flyingman:  Give these a read.  Smokin Okie says that pork loves vinegar.  My Wife and I were not sure about this.  I did 2 pork butts and mixed up a double batch of the pork injection.  There was a bunch of it left over from injecting the butts.  We started dipping some of the pork into the injection mix.  My wife finally said just pour it on the pans of pulled pork.  When we do it now we pour the injection mix onto the pulled pork until the meat will not take any more in.  We serve the pulled pork on hamburger buns with cole slaw on top.  Good eats.

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Idahomike, I live in Southeast Florida and we get some of the best Cuban Roast Pork around. Their secret is use of Naranja Agria (sour oranges). I can get the fresh sour oranges in any super market or buy the juice in a bottle. They also make a marinade already:

done.https://badiaspices.com/product/orange-bitter-naranja-agria-4128/

https://www.amazon.com/Goya-Ma...-Ounce/dp/B003T0AY90

This comes in many presentations if you can find it your way.  Goya and Badia are based here in Miami but you should be able to find all of this on Amazon as well.

Plan B is just mix orange and lime juice.

Don't forget the onion and garlic.

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