I've been thinking about getting a band saw for cutting meat. I wouldn't use it a lot. I process about 3 to 6 deer per season and if I had a band saw I would cut the occasional shoulder and hindquarter into bone in steaks.

I've seen the Buffalo Tools product on the internet and it seems to be the only one in its price range.

http://www.bargainoutfitters.com/cb/cb.asp?a=81438

I'm not interested in buying a new proffesional model which will costs thousands.

Anyone with experience with the Buffalo Tools product?

Any suggestions?

Thanks,

Richard
Original Post
esfishdoc, For what it's worth, I have been using a sawzall for years. A long fine tooth blade with the paint removed and the meat partially frozen works great for me. It may sound a bit barbaric but if you are the slight bit talented with the use of power tools, you can carve steaks like a pro in seconds. I find your venison bacon very interesting, I have a cut of last years elk that may become victim to your evil ways!
Pat
Western Wyo.
I own a bandsaw and use it for cutting woodworking projects.
I have no problem w/imported bandsaws. Biggest concern is replacement blades and guides.
I have friends who saws thought bones of deer ect, using a sabre saw.
They just cut the muscle with a knife and when it comes to the bone a sabre saw with a blade that has had the blade degreased and paint removed.
Hell ive seen my family members cut flesh and bone with handsaws.
I believe a quality sawzall with ultra clean blades would do a fine job doc.
Let us know on your decisions.
Mike
Yes! I have some experience with a band saw, not good, but an experience. Frowner

My best advice about band saws - buy one designed for your use. I was 13 years old and Dad told me to get the wheel of cheddar cheese out of the freezer and use the Ulu (Alaskan Native American knife) to cut a chuck of cheese for my mother, as she wanted to make maccaroni and cheese.

Well! Either I was too weak or the Ulu just didn't work for I couldn't get the knife into the cheese at all. Now, Dad had a woodwork band saw. Yep! I started a cut through the wheel of cheese and before it went two inches the band saw blade came off and when I opened it up it looked as if it had five pounds of cheese in, around and on every band wheel and guide - a mess.

Thank goodness Dad rarely used the band saw for it took me a week to clean it up and put it back together. When Dad sold that band saw to buy another model it still smelled like cheese.
Smiler

smokemullet
I read in one of my past issues of American Woodworker about someone who used a wood band saw to cut meat. It smelled like rotten meat for a good long time. The grease and/or oils in these things are probably toxic or carcinogenic. (I'm thinking petroleum or lithium based greases with additives) My dad used to work for Standard Oil making petroleum additives and he wouldn't think of eating what he made. I would put in a vote for a purpose-built unit.
quote:
Originally posted by smokemullet:
Yes! I have some experience with a band saw, not good, but an experience. Frowner

My best advice about band saws - buy one designed for your use. I was 13 years old and Dad told me to get the wheel of cheddar cheese out of the freezer and use the Ulu (Alaskan Native American knife) to cut a chuck of cheese for my mother, as she wanted to make maccaroni and cheese.

Well! Either I was too weak or the Ulu just didn't work for I couldn't get the knife into the cheese at all. Now, Dad had a woodwork band saw. Yep! I started a cut through the wheel of cheese and before it went two inches the band saw blade came off and when I opened it up it looked as if it had five pounds of cheese in, around and on every band wheel and guide - a mess.

Thank goodness Dad rarely used the band saw for it took me a week to clean it up and put it back together. When Dad sold that band saw to buy another model it still smelled like cheese.
Smiler

smokemullet


Love my Ulu!

I've already decided if I get a bandsaw it will be designed and intended to cut meat for the above mentioned reasons.

So far the Buffalo Tools product is the front runner....Would be nice to see one but I can't find anyone or anyplace local who has one.
quote:
Originally posted by Team Butcher BBQ:
We use the big commercial brands (Hobart, Biro, etc) Not had any use with the smaller home version. Just remember to always respect the saw and don't get to comfortable with it or you will be buying 9 fingered gloves for winter. Good luck and be safe.


In my line of work I take care of injuries and I've seen my share of saw injuries. The table saw seems to produce a lot of finger injuries....and then there is the "Skill" saw across the thigh. Not that this makes me any safer.... I just know what mistakes look like!

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