I’ve had an AmeriQue for nine years and use it pretty consistently with good results, however I’ve always wanted to have a more noticeable smoke ring on the briskets and I can’t seem to get one. Does anybody ever read load the wood tray after the initial wood burns out? Any other tips or tricks to achieve this would be appreciated

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I can't taste the smoke ring, so I don't worry whether there is one or not.

But I do use Prague powder #1 whenever I brine meat and usually have what looks like a smoke ring.

With electric smokers, the chemical reaction that causes a smoke ring is much less since the wood smoke density is much less. The previous poster is also correct about the presence of nitrates and nitrites (which also occur in heavy wood smoke and charcoal smoke). I don't use them if I can avoid it. I think the smoke ring is a big myth of BBQ. Sort of a religious talisman that doesn't really mean anything. Like the previous poster, I can't taste it, so why do I care about it? Search this site for more opinions. You'll find that KCBS does not allow smoke ring as a criterion for competition judging.

Last edited by jay1924
@hozer posted:

I’ve had an AmeriQue for nine years and use it pretty consistently with good results, however I’ve always wanted to have a more noticeable smoke ring on the briskets and I can’t seem to get one. Does anybody ever read load the wood tray after the initial wood burns out? Any other tips or tricks to achieve this would be appreciated

A sprinkle of Tender Quick let sit on it for about 12 minutes, then rinse it off. You can then put your rub on it too smoke.

On ribs, I put two Royal Oak briquets in with a small chunk of wood.

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