Okay, with the recent questions and seeing that some people hadn't tried this before or didn't even know what it was, here I go.

I had a practice turkey so wanted to give you some photos and options.

The whole idea of spatchcocking is to open the whole bird up, lay it flat and cook it flat. You can use this for Chicken as well.

Those that love to Spatchcock say that it cooks faster and the whole bird comes out even.

When I'm doing just turkey, I'll do this sometimes as an option. You really need enough space in your smoker to do this, but I LOVE the parting out of the meat, just makes trimming later that much quicker/easier.

I like this for the flexibility it gives me, that if the white/dark get done at different times, you can take them off when done.

Start with a whole turkey:


To Spatchcock you need to remove the spine.

This photo shows the area I'll cut out. I use a share knife and some kitchen shears



This photos shows the spine removed (and that's it at the bottom of the photo



OPTION
I like to remove the keel bone. That's the white shape above the spine. You can see where it was removed in the middle of the turkey, where you see the meat. I like to to this for easier trimming later and it lays flatter. NOTE: it is rather difficult to remove. You have to cut carefully and not ruin the breast meat.



Here's a view with the bird turned over.

You can cook it just like this OR
see the photo after this one



OPTION
Part out the bird. I cut the dark quarters off (thigh/leg) IMPORTANT. Be very away of the skin and where you cut it. You want to leave as much as skin as you can for the breast meat (which I didn't do this time to show you what happens if you cut it close. Just keep this in mind when you trim out the dark pieces.



Loaded in the smoker. I try to off set them so the bird above doesn't drip on the ones below.



Completed

Original Post
This also looks ideal for those who want to brine the bird in a smaller fridge. I find that a 10-12 lb bird is hard to fit in my fridge during Thanksgiving time. If I cut the bird up like this, I could get me a shallow Rubbermaid tub that is not s tall and will fit on one of the shelves.
quote:
Originally posted by Briggsy:
Just curious SmokinOkie since I also have an FE, what shelf and temp are you using. And give or take, about how long does a Turkey take?
Thanks
Briggsy


If you look at the sides of the next to last photo, I have the 7 rack in that particular FE. I used the next to top and then the one just above the temp probe.

I did them at 275, bumped to 325 for last 30 min or so. It was about a 14lb'er and only took about 2 1/2 hours.
quote:
Originally posted by SmokinOkie:
quote:
Originally posted by SmokinMAINEiac:
Smokin', you are THE MAN!


thanks, love doing the 101's and your post gave me the right question for one.

Russ


I just took a turkey out of the freezer. I'm going to spatchcock this weekend. Thanks for the excellent how-to.
I'm not Smokin'...but I can't see the backbone,being there or gone, making any difference in brining time,ya know, your brining the meat and it takes so long for the osmosis(or whatever) to work on the MEAT.

Tell me I gotta right Smokin',PLEASE!(LOL)
I just throw my bird in and spatchcock later. Haven't brined one that way.

Opening it up like that does help some, but I can't say how much or how little. My guess would still be a minimum of 36 hours. The size of the bird will matter.

If you cut it fully into parts, you could reduce it, but I think I still recommend in 101 (I'll have to look) that breasts alone need 24 hours.

I have a bucket I always use for brining. I've got my timing down for a two day brine, so I just brine them whole and spatchcock later.

Once I have my brine flavors, my timings, etc, I hate to experiment for turkey day.

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