The original 101 webpage is here:

Brisket 101 webpage

Here are two videos that should help, courtesy of the local paper and an event I did:

Brisket

MOINKS
Last edited {1}
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by MaxQue:
Sure wish I had access to 15 lb briskets Mad


If that makes you made, how about this?

I get them at the local Sam's. Not every week, but pretty frequent:

20lbs

.....and at 2.08/lb

ARRRRRGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!

I just might have to make the 90 minute drive to Sam's.
Last edited by maxq
Unless you have another reason to drive 90 miles to Sam's, I'd call first. Ours only carries flats on occasion. Of course, I'm in California where humus and sprouts are popular. Eeker
Actually, we've had weeks were I was lucky to find a 8lb'er and at over $3 a pd.

I'm happy when I see these.

Max, come for a visit. I'll get you 4 or 5, we'll freeze 'em and you take 'em back.
Come on down to Dallas in October Russ. Max is gonna help me cook the invitational. Then we're off to the hill country for a quick Que tour. He's gonna be sick of Que like I got sick of Lobster this week Smiler
Called Sam's in Concord & Manchester, NH. All they carry are flats. Same for Costco in Burlington, Vt

Got one of my meat purveyors working on it.

Russ, yeah baby...we'll have some fun. be warned though...Coach is bossy Smiler

Coach if the Lockart/Luling Que is as good as they say, I'm all good with it.
I would say Russ is lucky!! The only briskets our two SAM's carries is Select packers and Choice Flats. They do carry decent Ribs though, IBP if I'm lucky. I have been lucking into some 3 pack spares that were almost 18lbs (6 lbs each) that were trimmed into VERY nice SL. I have to admit I am becoming a SL convert over loin backs.....
quote:
if the Lockart/Luling Que is as good as they say, I'm all good with it


I am sure you will not be disappointed, I would say best in Texas.
quote:
Originally posted by MaxQue:
Better than Dickey's?

<grins,ducks,runs>


Like I say when I shoot skeet

PULL!!! Smiler
Out here in the San Francisco Bay Area, I've been finding packer briskets (as well as pork bellies, pork butts of all sizes) at Kinder's. And if they don't have any, they'll get them for you. Pags, do they have Kinder's stores in your area?
Had one in town here, and we frequented it regularly. But alas, our business wasn't enough to keep it from closing about 2 years ago. Great meats.

Is that the same outfit that makes the BBQ sauce? We love Kinder's roasted garlic BBQ sauce, which is carried by local grocers.
Yep, that's the same outfit. I've been seeing Kinder's sauces, marinades, and packages of marinating meats in Safeway and Costco. A Kinder's near my house has just expanded into a much larger space across the street from their original location. I looked in the window, and it looks like they're putting in a big meat counter. I can hardly wait to see what cuts they'll be selling.
quote:
Originally posted by SmokinOkie:
The original 101 webpage is here:

Brisket 101 webpage

Here are two videos that should help, courtesy of the local paper and an event I did:

Brisket

MOINKS

The link to the original Brisket 101 page seems to take me to the Cookshack products page. Is this correct?
Hey Guys i'm new on this forum. have been running a busy bbq restaurant for about a year and a half with a cookshack sm 160, brisket turns out really nice however, I don't really get a smoke ring on my meat, is it even possible with my smoker? as well is it possible to soak my wood prior to smoking, not sure if this is recommended with my smoker? I find the wood burns off really quickly then the smoke supply basically just runs out. What type of rubs work best for attracting smoke to your meat, Mine is high in sugar(brown)which is really nice on just about everything I smoke? thanks look forward to your comments...
From reading previous post about getting more bark in electric smokers, they recommend adding more sugar to rub (which ou did), they also recommend adding a couple of briquets to smoke box too.
Brett....welcome to the forum.

How much and what type of wood are you using? Soaking it isn't recommended as it will hinder smoke production. When I was using a CS 150 at my restaurant (use a FEC100 now) I used 4 oz of Oak + 4 oz Hickory for briskets and butts. The end result provided plenty of smoke flavor.

Electric smokers won't generate a smoke ring. Try adding 3-4 charcoal briquets to the wood pan and it will provide a thin SR.
Like G Cue said.The 160 has been the workhorse for commercial kitchen for decades.Mine is a 1996.

Your profile doesn't list where you are located,which often give us good info to work with.

First question is"How critical is it to your customer base"?If every one brings it up to you and you are losing sales,then it is worth addressing.

Heavy rub,with good sugar content is often a good choice.If you go the charcoal route,Kingsford seems to be the only brand that works.
Wet wood would be your worst choice in a cooker that already cooks very wet.How much wood are you using in a load?

Give us a little more info and the good cooks on here will try to help.
Fixed, again, thanks EV & JJ (problem with having something on the Internet for 10 years... it DOES move around a little)
quote:
Originally posted by Nomadx65:
How long did you smoke the moinks for?



Basically just cook until done to your preference if you're using pre-cooked meatballs as the original MOINK recipe requires.

There are a lot of variables, so if you want to discuss at length, let's start a new thread.
Hey everyone,
been away for some time now and I recently started getting back on here and catching up on a lot of great topics being discussed as well as some new forum categories.
Smokin Okie, I just want to say how much I appreciate all that you do for us and I also want to tell you how much I LOVE the brisket videos. Hope to see more videos in the future and just wanted to say it's great to be back.
quote:
Originally posted by BornHungry:
Smokin Okie, I just want to say how much I appreciate all that you do for us and I also want to tell you how much I LOVE the brisket videos. Hope to see more videos in the future and just wanted to say it's great to be back.


Glad you enjoyed it. I'm starting on a new project which will take this concept a little further and I HOPE to have plenty of video.

Welcome back.
As others noted, you won't get a smoke ring, unless your wood actually ignites in the woodbox, which would be a bad thing, or you add charcoal (charcoal contains the nitrogen dioxide from the burning process that made it charcoal). 'Smoldering' a piece of wood doesn't create the airborn notrogen like 'burning' wood does. You can read up a bit on the chemistry of what happens to form a 'smoke ring', but in reality, it is not a smoke ring, it is nitrogen dioxide slightly curing the outer portion of meat.

I also use a 160 in my restaurant (along with an FEC-120), and like the way it does Brisket (it's quite a moist smoker). Something I like to do is get the smoker up to temp prior to adding wood blocks, as the heating element isn't screaming hot trying to get up to initial temp. After coli not so hot, add wood blocks and you should get a slower initial smoke. Also, don't think that the wood isn't still doing it's job after the initial heavy white smoke - as that block smolders, it's putting out the 'thin blue smoke' for quite a while, and adding the good flavor you want. If you want to 'attract' smoke flavor, try keeping things moist. As example, I always try to smoke my Briskets with another meat (pork butts) on the shelf above it, so the fat dripping from the butts helps moisten the Brisket. The tasty bark of the briskets that were setting under pork butts for 12 to 14 hour is just awesome. A lot of my customers request I don't trim their beisket, they want all the flavorful fat. :-) My typical smoker load is (top down)pork butts, then a few shelfs of brisket, then butts on the bottom again. Butts on the bottom can handle more heat that Brisket and finish first. I try to avoid the top shelf, as I find it is the location that dries meats more.

I also find that using an additive to wet the Brisket can help take on more flavor. Many use mustard, I sometimes use Worcester to keep the rub wet when loading brisket onto smoker. I think it only helps moisten the first few hours, but I like how all turns out.

There are a few times that I pulled meats out of the SM160 and there was a thin smoke ring. That meant my wood ignited and burned off too fast, made smoker too hot, meats were dryer, and taste wasn't where it needed to be.
Rick



quote:
Originally posted by Brett huber:
Hey Guys i'm new on this forum. have been running a busy bbq restaurant for about a year and a half with a cookshack sm 160, brisket turns out really nice however, I don't really get a smoke ring on my meat, is it even possible with my smoker? as well is it possible to soak my wood prior to smoking, not sure if this is recommended with my smoker? I find the wood burns off really quickly then the smoke supply basically just runs out. What type of rubs work best for attracting smoke to your meat, Mine is high in sugar(brown)which is really nice on just about everything I smoke? thanks look forward to your comments...

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