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Lantern, Congrats on your new purchase. Im sure you will be very happy with it.
I believe I would wipe down the interior to remove the ???? oil and ect residue from the factory.
Then I would season it like is recommened here on the forum.
I think spraying pam on the interior would make a bigger mess to clean up in the future IMHO.
Good Luck and let us know how things work out.

Mike
quote:
Originally posted by shoundog:
I use it and cooking oils on other smokers but I dont think it will do much to help on the inside of the cookshack. Maybe wrong I dont think it will hurt eather.


That's exactly what I was getting at shoundog. I have always seasoned my stick burners like this and was wondering if it was viable or worthless in the cookshack. I did the usual in the smokette with the waterpan and a big butt. Just wondering out loud. Smiler
I had a stick burner and seasoned it for two reasons.
1)Its a hi carbon, lo nickle steel. It'll rust. The oil helps protect it. That's why I never cleaned the sides or top of the inside of the pitt. Only used enough water to get the grease out of the bottom. I only cleaned the grates just before a cook. Cooked on it for six years. Stored it in my garage and there was no rust on it when I sold it.
2)The initial oil helps the smoke kling to the walls. It takes many cooks to get a good kreosote build-up. This helps give the BBQ the unique "Pitt" flavor that everyoune looks for.

You don't need to use oil to season a stainless stee pitt, 'cause it won't rust.

Que on!
True, but a stick burner get's HOT.. and the way to season a steel/cast iron dutch oven, skillet, BBQ is with a low temp oil that will create that seasoning as the high heat burns it onto the surface. Cookshacks don't get hot enough to burn the oil on anything.. conversely, as GLH said.. will keep things (smoke ) from sticking to it properly.

A good dry, cleaned interior will develop a beautiful seasoning in short time. I say cleaned because most sheet metals are rolled to the proper thickness by huge/heavy rollers and the metal is lubicrated with an oil during rolling. I have no idea if CS cleans the metal before forming and welding. Therefore, I suggest a good detergent wash to remove any residual before seasoning. But, that's just my opinion.
Howdy, never did full time. We spent one year back in 2000 and my wife took a sabatacle and we were gone maybe 50% of the time and toured a lot of western states and BC, Canada. Otherwise, we have been spending her school vacations in the summer touring the states. Not this year tho.. her family illness' have kept her/us busy.

chipz40 (at) hotmail.com

Next question.. do/should I know you?? I love your "Holy Smoke".. wish I would have thought of that one Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Smokenque:
True, but a stick burner get's HOT.. and the way to season a steel/cast iron dutch oven, skillet, BBQ is with a low temp oil that will create that seasoning as the high heat burns it onto the surface. Cookshacks don't get hot enough to burn the oil on anything.. conversely, as GLH said.. will keep things (smoke ) from sticking to it properly.

A good dry, cleaned interior will develop a beautiful seasoning in short time. I say cleaned because most sheet metals are rolled to the proper thickness by huge/heavy rollers and the metal is lubicrated with an oil during rolling. I have no idea if CS cleans the metal before forming and welding. Therefore, I suggest a good detergent wash to remove any residual before seasoning. But, that's just my opinion.


I went ahead and sprayed Pam on the insides of the extra Cookshack(50) just out of curiosity. The walls were much darker and further along than when I seasoned my smokette the first time. Of course it makes me wonder what the hell I even asked and bothered everybody for in the first place if I was going to get curious and try it anyway. Wink Big Grin
Thanks for reminding me. My results with Pam turned out not so good after a few smokes.


I "think" the spray took the seasoning TOO easily. Meaning that it soaked up the not-so-good smells as well. Thus leaving me with a smoke flavor that was a bit off the money no matter what wood I used.....especially mild flavored woods though.

So...I decided to break out the steam cleaner and make a day of it as I blasted away everything down to the stainless. I followed that with a seasoning and the butts this weekend were back on track.

So, after a trial and ERROR process. I say no spray. LOL!! Big Grin


On a good note....
I actually found a vinegar based sauce that I like....and DIDN'T hand make!! Whoohoo!!

The stuff's called George's sauce. I highly recommend the "hot"(it's not at all hot though).
The original works well as a starting(cheater) base for your own BBQ concoction.

You can get it here. They also have some grocery stores that sell the stuff.
http://017d26a.netsolstores.com/

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