Hi everyone!

I picked up an SM0025 this past summer as a birthday gift to myself, and I've had some great success with it until recently. As of late, everything I've been smoking has come out tasting like ash. After searching the forums, I think I narrowed my problem down to creosote, and a heavy glaze coating on the sides of my smoker.

So far, I've scraped my smoker with a plastic paint remover, but that does not seem to have helped. At this point, I'm close to completely cleaning the interior out, and starting from scratch. I was curious if anyone else has experienced this problem, and any possible remedies that I may be missing.

Your help is appreciated! Thanks!
Original Post
I have had it a few times but I'm leaning more towards old wood or to much. Lately I've been getting that ugly yellow smoke in the early stages of smoke. When I see that I open door fully. The last time had to open I saw one of my chunks was completely on fire. Not sure if this happens often or not. I wouldn't completely clean your unit. Maybe just wipe down with really hot rags just to remove grease build up.
Yeah, I've noticed the same thing with a couple different kinds of wood that I have. I get really heavy smoke for the first 45 minutes. I have opened the unit and noticed the wood burning as well, but I don't really open the door at all when I'm cooking.
Like the experienced cooks above stated.
Unless you have large globs falling off the walls,be thankful that you now have it seasoned.
Experienced cooks find they can cook product like chicken pieces with no wood-just the seasoned walls.

Try cutting your wood back to one golfball sized chunk of decent wood.
Derrick,

Welcome to the forum. See your first posts, so we'll try to help.

I didn't see you indicate how much wood you are using?

The seasoning will add a little, but it won't be the factor of making it taste that way. More likely it's the amount of wood you're using.

How much and what flavor are you using?

Are you adding in more in after it stops visually smoking? FYI, just because you don't see the gray smoke doesn't mean it's stopped smoking.
Thanks for the information everyone!

So far, the largest problems I've been having have been with the Hickory chunks that came with the unit. For example, I've been using one chunk per smoke, and the average weight has been between 2-3 ounces.

I do have a variety of chunks from Chigger Creek that are cut to about 1 ounces. I may try a small 1 ounce apple chunk on a sausage role tonight, just to see if I have the same issues.

Also note, in the past, I got a little over zealous with the wood amounts when smoking beef, and had tried anywhere between 4-6 ounces of wood. I've since backed off that practice! Smiler
Thanks,

Smoke "taste" is 100% up to you so you have to determine that first. If it's too heavy, then just adjust the wood. If it's too light, then add.

Add and humidity level of the wood will vary, but I don't think enough so that most people will notice.

Variety of wood can make a huge difference. The apple smoke to me is one of the lightest smokes out there so that should help set a level of taste for you.

Keep good notes and you'll get there quickly.
I'd like to thank everyone here for their suggestions. I've got a 1 pound Jimmy Dean sausage log on right now. I've placed a .9 ounce chunk of Chigger Creek Apple wood in the wood box.

It may be too early to tell, but I think my biggest problem is the wood I've been using. I'm not expert, but a lot of what I have seems unaturally dry. By dry, I mean that there doesn't even seem to be any natural oils in the chunks. I do not currently, nor have I ever soaked any wood chunks that have gone into the wood box.

Is there such thing as too dry of wood?
quote:
Originally posted by Derrick:
I'd like to thank everyone here for their suggestions. I've got a 1 pound Jimmy Dean sausage log on right now. I've placed a .9 ounce chunk of Chigger Creek Apple wood in the wood box.

It may be too early to tell, but I think my biggest problem is the wood I've been using. I'm not expert, but a lot of what I have seems unaturally dry. By dry, I mean that there doesn't even seem to be any natural oils in the chunks. I do not currently, nor have I ever soaked any wood chunks that have gone into the wood box.

Is there such thing as too dry of wood?


Wood has a relatively long shelf life, but really old wood doesn't smell as good as "seasoned" wood (wood that has been cut for a 3-4 months). You do not want to use green wood either. I'd chuck that nasty wood and try some good stuff.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×