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Is this THE Big Wheel? It's Smokin'

With so many people having allergies, I'd tend to list the marinade ingredients but at the end of the product list like (marinade: soy, etc, etc).

Not sure of the labeling requirements but my sauce company and rub company are handling that aspect.

Is someone packing it for you, or at you doing it in the restaurant and then packing/labeling yourself?

Maybe check for some competitors jerky and see how they've labeled theirs.
quote:
Originally posted by Joe M:
Hold on a second! What's this about SmokinOkie RUBS & SAUCES?! I'm always the last to know!
Joe M


In Progress. Hold up is part Legal, Part Technical and part $$$. Let's just say the recipes are there and the rest is "in progress"

....

Now, no more threadjacking, back to our OP.
quote:
Originally posted by SmokinOkie:
Is this THE Big Wheel? It's Smokin'

With so many people having allergies, I'd tend to list the marinade ingredients but at the end of the product list like (marinade: soy, etc, etc).

Not sure of the labeling requirements but my sauce company and rub company are handling that aspect.

Is someone packing it for you, or at you doing it in the restaurant and then packing/labeling yourself?

Maybe check for some competitors jerky and see how they've labeled theirs.


Sounds like some good thoughts..thanks. I'm making it at the commercial kitchen..and then the owner is peddling some of it in the restaurant. He dont need a label on his. He can sell what he wants..cookies..jerky..or whatever. I been hitting a couple of beer joints and car lots..which is the ones I am trying to get a label made up for.
quote:
Originally posted by Cook One:
My company Perfect Bite BBQ, has 3 flavors of jerky. To sell on line I had to have a USDA approved facility prepare mine. Just a thought.


Gotcha on that I was a bit curious on the USDA thing. Since I dont have any plans to sell out of state wondering if they might still arise to afflict folks? I assume they dont bother local bbq restaurants but who knows?
Well I hate to continue to talk to myself about jerky but guess it will work as a last resort.

Bizness is good. We had been cutting it up into little squares for the seasoned citizens but the Warden say they might like to try biting off a hunk for themselves. So this brings us up to date..and everybody liked it fine.

Had a scare because we sent two bags off to one of the grand chillins who is currently hanging his hat in Utah for some reason. Anyway it was returned not deliverable 3 weeks later and had mold on it. Think I got to the root of the issue to bag it up dryer an putting a desiccant pouch in there with.

Also figured out a way to vacuum pack it using a hand pump. I only charge five bucks to teach folks how to do that. Thanks.
quote:
Originally posted by bigwheel:
Well I hate to continue to talk to myself about jerky but guess it will work as a last resort.

Bizness is good. We had been cutting it up into little squares for the seasoned citizens but the Warden say they might like to try biting off a hunk for themselves. So this brings us up to date..and everybody liked it fine.

Had a scare because we sent two bags off to one of the grand chillins who is currently hanging his hat in Utah for some reason. Anyway it was returned not deliverable 3 weeks later and had mold on it. Think I got to the root of the issue to bag it up dryer an putting a desiccant pouch in there with.

Also figured out a way to vacuum pack it using a hand pump. I only charge five bucks to teach folks how to do that. Thanks.


Mold is an issue, we sell about 4000 bags a year, and if the bag gets the smallest hole and let's any air in at all you will eventually get mold. We use a desiccant pouch as well, but if air get's in you will get mold.
Ok...been checking with some jerky conesewers and they seem to agree the best in the world comes from a locker plant in Post, TX. Its thick cut sorta like a steak finger from DQ and is encrusted with coarse grind black pepper. It has a bright red interior (which will take a wild guess entails the use of cure.) From the way the stuff looks in a pic from their website..if the stuff is dehydrated any its not dried much. Suspecting its cooked at low temps perhaps with or w/o smoke. Trying to decide if they use a marinade..dry cure or maybe a brine. I am going to try to post a pic of it. Any theories on how to clone it at home would be appreciated. Thanks.
ok.I have took a new step into the venture. Decided to sub out the salt for TQ on this batch. Hope it can take time to cure itself and turn red in the middle. Then while still wet gonna coat it up with a thick layer of Half cracked to powdery Black Pepper. To be known as West Texas style. Have a high confidence level..it might just work by golly. Yups will eat any thing that reeks of smoke. I broke them from sucking eggs on the hot variant last week. One guy ate two bags and the rest of the folks screamed Calf Rope.

PS Edit..Well got it smoked up and dried and is in the oven trying to kill any pesky ecoli type critters which might be lingering. The black pepper on the outside is sticking surprisingly good. Havent lost hardly any. Not sure how red it is on the inside but suspect it be redder than last time and the small amount of cure might do something good for it. The pepper was a bit costly cause I used about 1/3 pound or about 3 bucks worth to coat 12 pounds of strips. It coulda held more but I am a thrifty Scotsman.

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Last edited by bigwheel
quote:
Originally posted by bigwheel:
ok.I have took a new step into the venture. Decided to sub out the salt for TQ on this batch.


Careful partner!!! A little dab'll do ya with the TQ. I think it's 1/2 ounce pp dry or by the prescribed ration brined. You can't substitute it 1 for 1 with salt, you'll kill someone.

I make really great jerky, but darned if the USDA and states haven't regulated the taste out of the whole process. You have to have a meat processing facility to make the stuff and then the HACCAP plan nearly has to cook it dead before you smoke it any. Crazy stuff. I wonder how our forefathers did this for years and survived on it without all the help from the Feds.
Seems to be a lot of misconceptions about TQ floating around here. Its impossible for a human to ingest enough TQ to hurt themselves. They would be puking too much to get it down due to the salt intake. Mixing the nitrates/nitrites with salt is a safeguard. Best way to use it is pretend its salt because thats mainly what it is. On this last batch of jerky I used 1.5 Tablespoons for 2.5 cups marinade on 11 pounds of meat strip. Turned it nice n red but not quite salty enough. Think I bump that to 2 T. next time. For a curing brine I like 1 cup TQ per gallon of water. Just like salt.
http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/meat-curing-faqs
quote:
Originally posted by bigwheel:
... Just like salt.
http://www.mortonsalt.com/faqs/meat-curing-faqs


I got a couple of PM's from people that seem to think through reading this that salt and TQ might be the same.

From the Morton Website:

quote:
Can I use table salt or canning salt in place of curing salt?

No, table salt or canning salt cannot be used in place of curing salt. If used, you will get salted meat but the color and flavor of the meat will not be properly developed.


Key thing is that TQ contains more than salt, specifically nitrates/nitrites when perform specific functions that salt does not. Same reason why you can buy just Pink Salt (which is like TQ, but no salt, only the Nitrates/nitrites)

TQ contents:
quote:
Morton® Tender Quick® contains salt, sugar, propylene glycol, sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite.
Yes exactly. The way I was taught to use the stuff is in cured products. Just sub it out for the salt ration called for in the recipe. It will throw a great cure on the meat block and make it just right salty as a side benefit. For example a sausage recipe calling for so much Prague 1 ..Insta Cure..Modern Cure blah blah blah or a dry cure model calling for Prague 2..just use TQ for either/or and skip the salt in the recipe. It will come out just right. Great stuff and you dont have to do mail order to get it. Try Kroger..lol. Now being health food types we dont hold with consuming nitrates/nitites personally but as long as consumed in moderation should be ok. As mentioned earlier for a curing brine use 1 cup per gallon just as salt would be used. Hopefully enough sugar to balance it out for them who are into brines.
Last edited by bigwheel

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