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After watching BBQ Pitmasters last season and the latest show with Johnny Trigg, I figured I'd like to try his technique on ribs. Afterall, he has had great success with competition ribs. So, I got online and looked up his technique (which is secret but some think they have figured it out).

I saw several threads about his style, and the comments by this fellow pretty much covers what a number of folks stated:

"As for the liquid that Johnny put in the bottom of the ribs (when he foils), my guess is apple juice. This helps to steam and tenderize and flavor the ribs. Now, as for that margarine/honey/brown sugar frosting on the ribs, beware that this will almost literally turn 'em into candy. That's great if you're only gonna eat a bite or two as you get the "Wow" factor that BBQ judges are looking for, but not so great IMO for a backyard BBQ wherein you'll be eating several bones. Rather, I just apply more of the BBQ rub at this stage if I choose to foil along with some apple cider. Most of the time, I skip foiling altogether and just mist with a apple cider/whiskey mix every hour or so. To each their own though... some people like candy. Any kids there would probably love the rib candy."

Never thought about the "wow" factor for the judges. Any thoughts about his ribs being too sweet for a full dinner. I believe some on this forum know Mr. Trigg. Have you ever had his comp ribs for a meal?
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Somewhere along the way I saw, or read that he adds "Tiger Sauce" to his foil contents.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pags I found THIS over at Bretheren.

Last year I chatted with Chris Hart of IQUE at The Harpoon NE Championship contest. He says they've found that a combo of sweet & heat seems to do well with the judges. Next month I'm attending his competition class so I'll report back with any "secrets".

As for Mr. Triggs ribs, heck, I'll eat as many as he'll put on my plate Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Thank you.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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btw...I just started some loin backs within the hour. Gonna foil one rack "a la Trigg" with brown sugar, honey, Tiger Sauce and onion powder. I'll report back with pics and an After Action Report as to the (home) judges critique.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I agree on the sweet and heat. But to add on to that, I think up front sweet and back of the mouth heat is the best. The heat is there for flavor and for balance against the sweet.

And I currently have three racks of SL Spares on and am cooking them comp style. And I have no problem eating my comp style ribs for dinner!


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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RibDog, any suggestions on ingredients/ratios for my foiling experiment? In the past I've done equal amounts of honey and Q sauce, half that much margarine. This time around I'm thinking brown sugar, honey, margarine and a few shakes of Tiger Sauce...maybe some onion powder and a bit of Honey Rub. Thoughts? I'm about 2 hrs away from foiling.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Today's goal was competition style loin backs a la Johnny Trigg. Three racks in the 2.75# range. I gave them a light dusting of Lawry's Seasoned Salt and a rub consisting of 1 part Butchers Honey Rub + 1 part TxBBQ Championship rub.



Started them for an hour at 180 using Cookshack Hickory pellets. Kicked the temp up to 275 and gave them two more hours. Foiled them with 4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz maple syrup and a tbsp of Tiger Sauce. Cooked 'em meat side down for 45 minutes. Removed them from foil, painted them with home brewed Que sauce and gave them 15 more minutes.






End result...not as sweet as I had expected. A bit of candy like texture on the top meat but the spice from the rub and heat from the Tiger Sauce played off well. I was very happy and 3 adults and 2 kids ate all but 5 ribs Smiler

My work is done...time for a tasty adult beverage Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well, first of all, I always use SL ribs for comp purposes as I feel they have a more porky flavor. With everything else that is being put on them, they need to have porkiness to stand out in the end.

When I foil, I use 1/2 of peach preserves spread evenly over the meat side of the rack, then a handful of light brown sugar spread as evenly as possible. Then I put a back and forth squirt of Parkay over the length of the rack.

Once they come out of the foil, I scrape off any pieces of peach on them. They then get a heated mixture of 4 parts sauce, 1 part honey, and just a few spinkles of cayenne to offset the honey and for flavor. If you can taste the heat, you used too much.

Once glazed, they go back on the smoker for 10-15 minutes to stiffen up the glaze.

Does that help?


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Ribdog your just to kind!
 
Posts: 2908 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I imagine they tasted as good as they look.


My buddies call me "Bubba"
 
Posts: 386 | Location: Redford, mi | Registered: December 22, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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MaxQue--those look fantastic. Going to try it next time I do ribs. As you know, I want to try the Trigg method.

RibDog--Sounds like a winner. The Parkay is just a once back and forth or a few waves of the Parkay across the ribs?

When you foil, do you stack the racks on top of each other or do you lay them side by side in the foil?

I've bookmarked this page. My wife loves sauce on her ribs. Think she'll be a happy camper with both of these techniques.

I remember a recipe I've done a couple times--suggested by Todd. Not the Trigg method or use of foil, but after smoking the ribs finish them off on the grill with a combo of half strawberry preserves and half barbecue sauce for the glaze. Quite tasty.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You guys are pretty close on his rib recipe. What you are missing is the rub. That is where the heat comes from. The rub he uses is called "Rib Tickler". It is made by Williams Foods out of Texas. I get mine from The Kansas City BBQ Store. The rub along with Parkay, Brown Sugar, Tiger sauce and Honey. The other night on Pit Masters is the first time I new about a glaze. He never mentioned that last year. Good Luck!
 
Posts: 109 | Location: Pleasant Hill, MO | Registered: September 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Pags:

When you foil, do you stack the racks on top of each other or do you lay them side by side in the foil?



I wrap mine individually but I've seen others lay 2 racks, meat down in an aluminum foil pan.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ribdog your technique sounds scrumptious. A question on Parkay: I assume the squeeze bottles are used to allow more accuracy in how much is used? In my part of the world (Vermont) Parkay (squeeze or regular) isn't available. Would any softened stick margarine work?

JT Smokin, thanks for the heads-up on Rib Tickler.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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@cal - You are most welcome. Something was said once by a famous bbq comp cook, Mike Scrutchfield, that even if he told someone every step he used in his cooking process, you still had to be a good cook to come up with a good end product. That is why I don't mind sharing.

@Pags - I put each rack of ribs in a piece of foil by itself. And the Parkay is just like a wave pattern, back and forth, in one continuous line down the rack. Don't get wrapped up too much of the details as the Parkey will melt within a few minutes. I use the wave pattern to try and get an even dispersal over the rack when it melts.

@Max - I don't see why you could not use the softened margarine. Heck, you could probably put the softened marg. in a squeeze bottle and use that.

Max, one thing I noticed about your finished ribs is the bits and pieces of rub on the ribs. If this for a competition, quite a few judges I know do not like a gritty feel when they bite into a rib. Including me. It makes you wonder what you are biting. Especially on ribs where you can get bone dust or bone chips from a bad butchering job.


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RibDog:

Max, one thing I noticed about your finished ribs is the bits and pieces of rub on the ribs.


The TexasBBQ Champ Rub has course ground pepper in it. I use it primarily for brisket but wanted to try it on ribs...with a bit of smoothing from the Butcher Honey Rub. Thanks for the tip...wouldn't have ever thought of that.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Dang RibDog. You've got a fine eye. Guess one needs that to become a good cook. I'll incorporate MaxQue's and JT Smokin's tips with yours and hopefully hit a homerun.

Thanks for the help guys.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One of the first suggestions that I make to anyone who wishes to compete is to become a certified judge and some contests. Not only will you learn what is being turned in, you will what judges like and dislike.

Being that all four of us were judges when we started cooking as FirehouseBBQ way back when is why I think we started out so well.

@Pags - It is the smallest of details that will trip you up in comps. And usually the simplest things to fix.


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Well. We had the ribs tonight. Followed a combination of MaxQue's and Ribdog's recipes.

I lightly sprinkled with Lawry's Seasoned salt and rubbed with Dr. Barbecue's BBQ Rub. Into the smoker at 180* for an hour then kicked up to 275* for 2 hrs. Used the Johnny Trigg recipe as described by MaxQue(foiled them meat down with 4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz maple syrup and a tbsp of Tiger Sauce combined and squirted fairly heavily on them. I did 3 racks and had enough of this stuff for a couple more racks). Put them into the smoker for another hour. After I foiled, I used RibDogs glaze (heated mixture of 4 parts Memphis barbecue sauce, 1 part honey, and just a few sprinkles of cayenne. If you can taste the heat, you used too much). I let them sit in the smoker unfoiled for another 15 minutes to set the glaze. Took them out and double heavy duty foil/beach towel for 20 minutes.

OMG. Best ribs yet. Four other people ate them. Got 2 "best ever". A "these are awesome". And a "did you take good notes" from the little woman.

Thanks MaxQue and RibDog for all the help. They were moist, smokey (I used a packet of cherry pellets and 2 chunks of hickory), flavorful, sweet with a slight spice followup. Glad I started the post cause my attempt would have missed the target. The Johnny Trigg technique and the glaze combined nicely.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The folks who dined on the baby/loin backs last weekend have begged their' way back for more this coming weekend.

I'm planning to do RibDogs SL spares with his peach foiling component and the Johnny Trigg rub he mentioned, if it gets here in time. Add to that a CAB packer brisket and some yummy "sides".

I'll report back with pics and tasting notes.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Yep. I'm doing RibDogs spares also. Got the peach preserves today. I was out of rib rub so I just ordered the Rib Tickler rub.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ya'll have some good eating ahead of you.

Don't skip Ribdog's comment that each recipe/technique is a complete piece of work.

Often,using just parts of several doesn't produce the same results.

The most important tip could still be Smokin's "take good notes and adjust one thing at a time"

A quick note/anecdote is we have been fortunate to set up next to John and Trish a bunch of times over the last few years..

At comps,drbbq feeds a small group of cooks on Friday night and fixes spares the "Trish Trigg way" with beans and some smoked sausage.

It is sraight backyard style,which is what she and John prefer to eat.

It is covered earlier in the archives,to show the comparison to what cooks actually eat. Wink


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Max,

I don't think I mentioned the Johnny Trigg rub. What I use is Bonesmoker's rub, white pepper, cayenne, and turbinado sugar on mine before going in the smoker.


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A few posts up, JT Smokin mentioned Rib Tickler Rub.

"What you are missing is the rub. That is where the heat comes from. The rub he uses is called "Rib Tickler".
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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The combo I tried turned out great. I didn't have a finishing glaze, and I've used one similar to RibDog's in the past with good results. Fun trying different recipes.

Even though I bought the Rib Tickler rub, I'd like to try RibDog's recipe in total. If he would be so kind to share proportions on his rub.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Johnny may have changed his method some.

But there are a two more items that are being left out of the step for his rub.

And one item for the wrapping step.

Then there is the glaze.

RandyE


EastTennQCrew

FEC 100 (2)
FEC 500
KCBS CBJ
 
Posts: 303 | Location: Kingsport, Tenn. | Registered: August 11, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Now Pags,you know, that ya could find a guide line in one of them books on proportions and try once. To tell you the truth. What folks in the SE like and folks out West like is from day to night and that's not counting us sane folks here in the Heartland. lol...This is why I'm judging to see what the judges seem to taste. Just a thought!

Try once and see what you think "you will like" and correct from there.
 
Posts: 2908 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Cal. I see you're busting my chops again.

I actually like trying different recipes from other parts of the country. Nice to know how others like their stuff when they talk food. Why can't a Chicago boy enjoy a Carolina "Sammich"?

I've lived in Chicago area, Buffalo area, and Sacramento area and travelled a bit for work. Really enjoy different cuisines. How boring eating the same stuff over and over. Eat your ribs dry using the KISS method. Try Johnny Trigg's technique. Give RibDog's a try. Hey. If someone is proud of their results, I'll give it a shot. Especially when it sounds like they know what they're talking about. Smiler
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One more comment about what folks in other areas like to eat/taste.

One of our mentors had been taught to go to a town's large grocery and look at the bbq sauce shelves.

Not counting the cheap "lossleader",look at what sells mostly.

The other is" new to travel cooks" ask what changes they should make to go to different areas to suit the judges.

The judges are trained to a "standard",altho just taste can be somewhat subjective.

The other thing is many of the certified judges travel the whole bbq circuit,so you could get the same guy in FL,TN,and Canada.

Most advise to "cook what you cook best".

There are also so many cooking classes that much of the good product out there can seem almost "generic to America".

Just a couple things to ponder. Smiler


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Well. I couldn't put it off any longer. I had to give RibDog's rib technique a try. So yesterday I invited my son and his fiance as well as my daughter and grandkids to join Maur and me for the feast. As usual, I focused on the ribs and my wife focused on everything else. Except the wine. Wink

I still prefer baby backs so that's what I went with (I think it's the texture I like from the loin section). Lightly sprinkled them with Lawry's Season salt and then coated them with Williams Rib Tickler rub. Into the smoker with a couple chunks of hickory and wild cherry chopped into smaller pieces. Followed RibDog's technique to the tee so I won't repeat it here (it's in a couple of the above posts).

Well. Now I know why John goes by the RibDog handle. He knows his ribs. The ribs turned out delicious, tender, pull off the bone. Sweet with a mild spicy follow up. While we ate I received compliments from everyone except my granddaughter. She was too busy chomping down. Ate 5 ribs which is a record for her. She's tiny.

We had 1.5 racks left over. Into the FoodSaver bags and the freezer. Looks like we'll enjoy them again for dinner next week.

Funny. I always thought I made good ribs until I bought a Cookshack and joined this forum. Thanks to Ribdog, MaxQue, Smokin, Todd, Tom and others I'm now making the best ribs (and Q) of my life. This forum rocks.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had to try these methods too. I have been making some good ribs but not what I would consider great, until now. I used the Rib Tickler rub and cooked one rack with the Trigg/MaxQue foil and glaze method and one rack with the RibDog foil and glaze method.

These were definetly the best ribs I have made and my wife agreed. Personally, I liked RibDog's a little better. I can't thank everyone enough for sharing their techniques, especially John (RibDog)& MaxQue.
 
Posts: 39 | Location: Pittsburgh, PA | Registered: June 15, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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Well, I thought I like dry ribs until I made these! I followed MaxQue Technique almost to the letter. The only difference was that I rubbed the ribs with honey before I applied the mix of rubs he suggested. Also, I added a LOT more Tiger Sauce to the Parkay glaze. My wife REALLY liked these. I probed the ribs, but resisted the urge to "fool" with them during the cook. I relied completely on the time lines. THANKS to MaxQue for the recipe and Pags for starting the thread!!

BTW, I gave my neighbor who has been "jonesing" for my smoker, a little over a half rack and he thought they were some of the best ribs he ever had!


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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OK, OK, now I am HOOKED......but my wife is TOTALLY addicted to these... I did 6 racks this past weekend with the intention of putting at least 4 in the freezer. ONE made it, lol. While I was doing them Saturday, she asked if she could invite some of her friends over to share, then a buddy of mine came by and then the leftovers............

SIGH, oh well....... Big Grin


THANKS MaxQue!!


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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Glad the process worked. But some advice. The times WILL vary. You can't do this for a set time. The size of the ribs will change how they come out. Just watch that as you do these more. I always suggest that you weigh your ribs to know how to monitor the times.

Congrats on finding a method.
 
Posts: 14419 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:



THANKS MaxQue!!


Glad to be of help!

I've tried some other sweet/savory rub combos that also work well:
Cimmaron Docs + Triller Pig Powder
Rib Tickler + Tx BBQ Championship

Of them all, I still like the Butcher BBQ Honey Rub + Tx BBQ Champ rub the best.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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We've made ribs using the MaxQue Method, oops, the Johnny Trigg method, a couple times now and combined it with Rib Dog's barbecue sauce. We love it.

I used the Lawry's Season Salt/Rib Tickler rub to start, the same margerine/Tiger Sauce combo, and Rib Dog's barbecue sauce each time. They turn out great. Also, followed RibDog's to the T, and they are also awesome.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Pags:
Also, followed RibDog's to the T, and they are also awesome.


As have I and I agree with you, whole heartedly.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I always like to toss in this one last thought, about all these fine cooks.

We've had the pleasure of setting up by John and Trish Trigg for several years and the even greater pleasure of being Ribdog's teammate for even more years.

Neither of these fine cooks fix their personal dining ribs this way.

Actually, at contests,they tend to eat pizza,fried fish,or maybe Chinese when we go out. Big Grin

These are for comps and comp practice.

Just something to ponder. Wink


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Tom Tom. I know there are "tricks" with the recipes we're talking about. When you cook up a batch of ribs at home, what is your favorite method. That is, if you don't mind sharing.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yesterday I tried a new rib tweak passed on by Coach.

Started with a rack of babybacks (2.75#) Patted down 1/2 cup of brown sugar on either side, wrapped them and held for 2 hrs ---no rub; just sugar. This is the new tweak.

Just before cooking I applied a sweet rub (Rib Tickler) to the underside, savory rub (Texas Barbecue Competition) to the top. Any sweet/savory rubs could be substituted.

Smoked 'em 2 hrs at 270 spritzing with apple juice every 20 min or so.

Made a foil pack of:
1/2 c light brown sugar moistened with apple juice via spritzer
5 tbsp soft margarine
2 Tbsp Tiger Sauce
3 Tbsp Agave Nectar
1/3 c BBQ sauce
wrapped tight and cooked meat side down for 1 hr.

Removed foil packs and release steam letting ribs tack up, meat side down for 15 minutes. Re-seasoned with a light dusting of Lawry's.

Finished them on at 270, meat side up for 20 minutes, basting with Que sauce.

Quite possibly the best ribs I've ever tasted.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Like many cooks,if running the cooker at home ,I'd be be doing at least a half to a doz slabs,so all these practice tricks get to be very time consuming.

We like the heaviest 3 paks of fresh IBPs that Sam's has.

Usually a couple sides,couple of appetizers,a salad and ,some TX toast.

Like all of ya'll we skin the slabs and trim the spares to St.Louis.

We like to season the slabs while the cooker is stabilizing.

We kinda like pecan,but am not sure how many folks notice.We pay attention to not to heavy rub,because there is not too much meat to bone ratio.

Also like,to do the loinbacks around 250* and spares around 275*.

When a toothpick passes easily between the bones,we pull them off and cut into about three ribs sections.

We like dry with CS mild on the side,but have no problem with brushing lightly with the same and reseasoning very lightly and allow to glaze about 10-15 mins.

Cold Shiner Bock,or Abita and some Jerry Jeff Walker,or Asleep at the Wheel often rounds it out.

This leaves me time to enjoy my friends and don't feel like I've been a slave to the cooker all night.

We enjoy the simple life. Cool


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I knew whatever you did, there would definitely be a KISS approach to it. They turn out great that way. Rub, wood, and the Cookshack smoker.

That said, we're celebrating my son's birthday today so he requested ribs for dinner. I'm using the MaxQue/RibDog combination I did earlier as I mentioned above but with Rib Tickler Rub. Looking forward to the treat when it's ready. Baked regular/sweet potatoes, salad, heated 3 cheese bread from the bakery, grilled asparagus. Hmmmmmmmm.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yep,you sound more like an experienced cook everyday. Smiler

A lot of our comments are to allow the cooker to work FOR us,and not the reverse.

As we learn the cooker,we can become very flexible in the approach to our needs.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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Well, MaxQue after my 6TH!! batch of ribs using your recipe...... Well everyone that has tasted these have declared that they are the BEST Ribs ever, and the one person that matters (my wife) who gets excited (who was NOT a BBQ fan) that I am making the ribs I am SOLD on this recipe! THANKS again!!! The only change I made is to rub the ribs with honey before I put your suggested dry rub on.


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Much obliged for your very kind compliments sir.

Did you use honey in addition to the initial rub of brown sugar...or as a substitute? I've got a St. Louis Spare smoke coming up this weekend and think I'll try YOUR tweak.

As I'll be using my AQ (iso FE100) for these spares perhaps you can guide me with time and temp guidelines. I'm guessing a total of 4-5 hrs at 250. I'll be shopping for full spares today. The St Louis cut down will probably weigh in around 3 lbs each.

And yes, the toothpicks will be waiting Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Would someone please point me to Ribdog's sauce recipe?
 
Posts: 129 | Registered: January 17, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by RibDog:

Once they come out of the foil, I scrape off any pieces of peach on them. They then get a heated mixture of 4 parts sauce, 1 part honey, and just a few spinkles of cayenne to offset the honey and for flavor. If you can taste the heat, you used too much.

Once glazed, they go back on the smoker for 10-15 minutes to stiffen up the glaze.

Does that help?


If you're talking about the glaze he uses on his ribs, this is it. It's in his post further up this thread.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Jim, the sauce I use is Cookshack Mild.


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Okay. Thanks.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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quote:
Originally posted by MaxQue:
Much obliged for your very kind compliments sir.

Did you use honey in addition to the initial rub of brown sugar...or as a substitute? I've got a St. Louis Spare smoke coming up this weekend and think I'll try YOUR tweak.

As I'll be using my AQ (iso FE100) for these spares perhaps you can guide me with time and temp guidelines. I'm guessing a total of 4-5 hrs at 250. I'll be shopping for full spares today. The St Louis cut down will probably weigh in around 3 lbs each.

And yes, the toothpicks will be waiting Smiler


No brown sugar, ONLY Honey before the rub. It aids in getting the Lawry's season salt and rub to stick. I drizzle enough on and rub it until it coats.

I use your recipe almost to the letter. 1/2 Butchers Honey Rub and 1/2 TxBBQ Grand Championship rub. 1 hr at 180* and then bump temp to 275* for 1:50 hrs. Pull apply the glaze at a ratio of 4 oz Brown sugar, 4 oz Parkay, 3oz Maple syrup, Tiger sauce to taste. I use a LOT more Tiger Sauce than you mention. After glaze, foil 45 minute at 275* meat side down, pull unwrap and apply BBQ sauce and return for 15 minutes to set sauce. As you can see its your recipe to a T, with a few tweaks for me.

I cook Loin backs that are around 2.75 to 3 # each in a rib rack that can hold 7 slabs. Usually i cook two 3 slab cryovac packs. Once I go to foil I use flat racks in the smoker.


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'll have to give the honey coat a try next time.

I brown sugared 2 beautiful racks of St Lou's last night. They're getting happy now with a sprinkle of Trim Tabb's Pig Powder & Smokin Guns Hot...both great rubs btw.

T-90 till launch time Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I'm doing the ribs for Super Bowl Sunday and am going to throw the comp style ribs that I've mentioned above at the group. Since it's a real food fest, most people eat just a couple. So I figured it'd be like a comp judge eating a small sample, and the pizass would work well. Except for my pal Bill who by himself eats nearly a rack. And me of course. I ignore most of the stuff and focus on the ribs primarily and another bud's chicken wings and another bud's deviled eggs. And the Budweiser.

Normally, I've done them dry rub with a light glazing, sauce on the side. We'll see how these are received.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Oh, by the way. The ribs turned out great. I normally keep them warm in a Nesto Roaster Oven set to low. Over the course of the day (I get there a couple hours earlier than most to help out), the ribs tend to get drier. This time I tried a little water/beer (it's what's recomended), and the ribs tended to get a little mushy. But the recipe was well received.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I followed this recipe last night with a few adjustments. I couldn't find tiger sauce and used Texas Pete's. I couldnt find either rubs and used Grill Mates pork rub. The brown sugar and maple syrup, and butter method worked really well. My question is:

Do you mix the brown sugar, maple syrup and tiger sauce together and then apply? Or do you apply in layers? Do you apply to both sides? I applied to both sides and they turned out pretty good. These questions are for anyone who has tried this method...thanks.

Family said these were the best of my 4 attempts at ribs.


Smoking on:
FEPG500
SM025
SM150
 
Posts: 1072 | Location: Santee Ca. | Registered: December 15, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Well,the thread is "John Trigg's Ribs" ?,but with all the changes it has reverted back to Bill and Barb Milroy's/Texas Rib Rangers' technique from 25 yrs ago.

Some comp cooks ,cooking alone with the time and 3rd hand constraints,will mix them together-if they have worked out the measurements to give them flavor and consistancy.

Most cooks,given the time,add the products individually.

Some only glaze the tops-since they are being parboiled,anyway.Some flip them and do both.

Try some side by side and see which works best for you.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I mix them.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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One of the first things taught to me by Smokin' was always do one one way, take GOOD notes and then do one another way, take GOOD notes and see for yourself how you like it. Everyone has a little different way/process of cooking and you need to learn what works out best for yourself and build on what your comfortable with.

No wrongs or rights when it comes to Qing.
 
Posts: 2908 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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Padre, Tiger sauce is not like Texas Pete's, It is thicker, hot, tangy and a little sweet. I order the Rubs, both are really good. I mix the brown sugar, maple syrup and butter or Parkay. I use a LOT more Tiger Sauce than called for, I add until I like the taste. I REALLY like the results of this recipe (as has EVERYONE who have tried them!).


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'll give a thumbs up for the Tiger Sauce too. I'm due to make ribs again & will do a variation of maple syrup, butter, brown sugar & tiger sauce (it's my favorite so far)...mix together & apply to the ribs & let it set for about an hour. After that I apply my spices (I've been using the cookshack ribrub & spicy chicken rub) and set it back in the fridge for another hour (unless I hear the stomach grumble then I pull 'em out) then I smoke. I've been using around 2.5 oz of cherry wood & an ounce of hickory at 225 for four hours. I've found when I have the smoker loaded with 3 racks, it will take longer. I pulled 'em out at 4 hours because everyone was ready to eat at that time. They didn't fall off the bone and probably could have used another hour.
Can't do them this weekend though, I have to do some pecans & almonds for a few co-workers & I have a lot of jerky & sausage to make from the venison I got over the winter.
 
Posts: 9 | Location: Tinley Park IL | Registered: January 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Registered Old Fart
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Well, I used my FEC for the first time since I got it last Thursday. I did the tried and true Trigg/MaxQue/Pags/Ribdog Rib method and all I can say is WOW. Same recipe, that I modified to suit my style/tastes but turned out better in the FEC than the AQ. Pink all the way through, six slabs of loin back perfection.

I only have one complaint about the FEC100, the grills will not fit my dishwasher, I hadda wash em by hand...... Oh, well the price we pay for our addiction....... lol.


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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the racks are huge, compared to the electric smokers. They won't even fit in my wife's stove. Makes me feel like something, having more rack space than her.
 
Posts: 565 | Location: Jay, Oklahoma | Registered: September 28, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is a recipe I hand to friends when asked how I make my ribs. It sounds pretty close to whats being talked about here.

BBQ Ribs
After trimming the ribs ( I trim them down to KC Cut and remove the membrane), I coat them with Extra Virgin Olive Oil and then apply the rub I used the

Home BBQ Rib Rub

Let them sit in the refrigerator in big baggies for at least 3-4 hrs. I do this the night before so I get about 12 hours of marinating.
My smoker (Stump's Baby) takes about 30-40 minutes to come up to cooking temperature (220 degrees). I start the coals and get the smoker heating up. At this point I take the ribs out of the baggies and put the crown side up and apply the rub again, just on the top side (crown). When the smoker reaches temperature, I put the ribs in the smoker, again crown side up, and put my wood chunks in the smoker. I use Sugar Maple, Peach or Cherry. I add wood again after about an hour. Keeping the 220 degrees is important. After about 2 hours in the smoker, I pull the ribs out. They should have a nice mahogany color to them.
I then use Heavy Duty Aluminum foil, and in the middle where I'll set the ribs, I put down Squeezable Parkay Margarine. (Butter has a lower burn temperature, so margarine is best). The amount I use is to run a bead of margarine the length of the slab of ribs, and then run another back to where I started. I then put down a thin layer of brown sugar, about 1/8-1/4 of an inch, the length and width of the slab of ribs. I then add honey in the same method as the margarine. Put the slab of ribs, crown side down on top of the mixture. Seal the foil and cook for another 45-60 minutes again, at 220. The purpose for foiling is to basically steam the ribs vs. continued heat which evaporates the moisture. All to not dry out the ribs.
Remove the ribs from the smoker and foil. Be careful when you take the ribs out and unfoil them. The juices in the foil wrap will be hot, sticky and if spilled makes quite a mess to clean up.
Place them back in the smoker, with crown side up. Cook until done. Done is usually determined by when you lift the slab, the "bark" will crack a bit, but the bones should NOT fall out of the meat. That would be over done, but some folks like it that way. This last cooking step is to firm up the glaze.
The reason for the brown sugar/margarine/honey is to "glaze" the ribs. The first 2 hours of cooking you're embedding the smoke and rub flavors into the meat. The glaze adds a bit of sweetness to the final product.
BTW, I use Splenda brown sugar since I'm diabetic and it doesn't seem to change the taste from using real brown sugar.
Start to finish on the cooking is usually about 4-5 hrs.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: June 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Thanks for the recipe. Sounds great.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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FBA Judge - a suggestion for your foil pouch:

Search out Tiger Sauce - sold in some grocery stores and fine food stores. It's a hot/sweet condiment sauce which adds a nice zing in contrast to the brown sugar. I use about 3 TBSP per pouch.

If you can't find Tiger Sauce, try Stubb's Pork Marinade.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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FBA judge,

you might want to make your own posts. With it buried in another post, people won't really see it under the Johnny Trigg method.

Just want people to be able to find it. Unfortunately I can't move a post to a new thread.

Welcome and thanks for joining.
 
Posts: 14419 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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quote:
Originally posted by FBA_Judge:
..( I trim them down to KC Cut and remove the membrane)


What's a KC cut? I know a St. Louis, and have heard people call a KC cut, but haven't heard it explained.
 
Posts: 14419 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From amazingribs.com Porknography

"Kansas City cut. Not a commonly accepted term, it is usually used to refer to what is otherwise known as a St. Louis cut. Sounds like a little Missouri rivalry to me."
 
Posts: 1096 | Location: Streamwood, IL | Registered: April 16, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had always been taught that a KC cut of spare ribs was a St. Louis cut but the flap meat left on.


John
 
Posts: 2098 | Location: St. Petersburg, FL | Registered: July 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yep,I'd always heard what Ribdog said,but you don't see them.

Maybe we hung around too many of the same guys?


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I did trim to St Louis cut. Seems around here when I go to Albertson's or the Restuarant Depot, I can buy them labelled KC cut, but they are trimmed to St Louis.

I will keep my eye out for the Tiger Sauce.

Thanks for the input.
 
Posts: 2 | Registered: June 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here in FL Tiger Sauce is as common as ketchup.Most any grocery,etc.

For those really desperate,some folks will mix ketchup and Lee and Perrins to taste.


Good Q 2 Ya,Tom.
 
Posts: 9894 | Location: Satellite BeachFL,USA | Registered: March 02, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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At the restaurant we make a Sweet Thai Chili Dipping Sauce for our Spring Rolls. It's pretty darn close to Tiger Sauce. I just put a sticky note on my desktop to post the recipe.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Finally had some r&r time this afternoon and was searching the "favorite recipe" archives. Found this post dating back to March 2001, posted by Texaskingfish. Read it through and see if it sounds vaguely familiar. Maybe Texaskingfish is the Clark Kent alias of J.T. Smiler

In a Sauce Pan: 1 cup Apple Cider Vinegar 1 Large Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice 2 Fresh squeezed Lemons 3 2inch slices of lemon PEEL (yes Peel) 1 Texas heaping tablespoon of DARK BROWN SUGAR 1 tablespoon Lemon Pepper 1 tablespoon Black pepper (fresh Ground ) 1 teaspoon Taba**o Hot Sauce or more mmmmmm 1 teaspoon Garlic powder (DONT GRAB THE GARLIC SALT By MISTAKE) ************************************ SIMMER on low til sugar dissolves NOT BOIL ## Remove the membrane off of the Ribs !!! I have not seen anything posted in the past about it but It is a must for me (and most of the competition cookers around here)!!! Use a knife tip to get the membrane (clear skin on the surface of the rib bones) started Then i take a phillips screw driver and roll it around til the membrane is loose and pulled off. Rub ribs with dry rub Okies is fine .It is a cross of 2 of my rubs It will work great. roll ribs and place in a zip bag covered with Marinade remove air and refridge for 1 1/2 -2 hrs. Pour out marinade. re-rub with dry rub and put back in refridge for 10-12 hours. Then cook them up ..... More to the story here but not going to give out all the secrets. These will still be just awesome !!!!! Good bit of work (The day before the judging) but well worth it on game day. Part 2 -the cooking process start at 250 with meat side up for 1 hr meat side down 1/2 hr remove and place on a foil sheet cover with more dry rub & your favorite Honey BBQ sauce double wrap ribs in foil & back in for 4 hrs at 225 (3 1/2 sealed & 1/2 uncovered. meat should be pulled back 3/8 of an inch brusk another coat of bbq sauce and re-wrap let sit wrapped up for 30 minutes. then cut them with meat side down.

I had to combine two posts. Smokin had to arm wrestle part 2 from him.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I see ribs in my future with maybe a dozen out of towners trying a process very similar to this one. Cool
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Gentlemen, do any of you use rib racks on your smokers? From what I have read it does not appear so, but wanted to check. Great participation in this forum... newbie - JC
 
Posts: 2 | Location: BBQ Country NC | Registered: September 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just did six racks this past weekend using my rib rack. If I do a lot of ribs I'll use my rack, if it's only a couple of slabs then no.
 
Posts: 1096 | Location: Streamwood, IL | Registered: April 16, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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MaxQue - used the wrap in foil with the brown sugar method you created. got the best ribs ever. thanks man - mentorjustin



quote:
Originally posted by MaxQ:
I'll have to give the honey coat a try next time.

I brown sugared 2 beautiful racks of St Lou's last night. They're getting happy now with a sprinkle of Trim Tabb's Pig Powder & Smokin Guns Hot...both great rubs btw.

T-90 till launch time Smiler
 
Posts: 2 | Location: BBQ Country NC | Registered: September 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hi all, I'm planning to try out the MaxQ and RibDog techniques on Sunday. I'm going to have to substitute rubs, as I don't yet have the ones called for. I was wondering if someone could share feedback on the Texas BBQ Championship Rub. Want to use a rub that is comparable to it but not sure about its flavor profile. Is there any sweetness to it, or is it all savory? Any feedback would be great.
 
Posts: 46 | Location: Chicago | Registered: December 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Rib Tickler is more sweetness than savory.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
MaxQue - used the wrap in foil with the brown sugar method you created. got the best ribs ever. thanks man - mentorjustin


Glad you enjoyed them but I didn't create the method. Thank Johnny Trigg, who's been using this technique for 20 years and taking to the bank ever since.

quote:
I was wondering if someone could share feedback on the Texas BBQ Championship Rub. Want to use a rub that is comparable to it but not sure about its flavor profile.


TX Champ is a somewhat spicy, bold rub. Similar rubs that come to mind are Cookshack Brisket rub, Bovine Bold and Smokin Guns (hot or mild)or Cimmoron Docs.

The idea is to build flavor layers using the bold & sweet rubs to offset each other. I tend to go a bit lighter on the savory vs sweet. I'll also re-season with both towards the end of the cook.

Hope that helps.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My first ribs a few years ago were done using the similar technique I found in Dr BBQ's excellent Big-Time Barbecue Cookbook. I've never had any reason to vary that recipe ... till now. I'm curious to see how the peach would taste instead of the honey
 
Posts: 85 | Location: Auburn, MA | Registered: September 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I was wondering if someone could share feedback on the Texas BBQ Championship Rub. Want to use a rub that is comparable to it but not sure about its flavor profile. Is there any sweetness to it, or is it all savory? Any feedback would be great.

Hi Steve....Didn't want to tell you but but since you are asking about the TX BBQ rub your sauce and rub package is scheduled to be delivered to you r home tomorrow (Monday). It has some TX BBQ rub included in it. I use a combination of the Championship rub and the original rub. I absolutely them!! Hope you enjoy!! They are a little spicy but after smoking it mellows out. I also use the Tribb method with brown sugar and they are fantastic ribs!! Just did 3 racks yesterday and always a big hit. I never sauce them during the smoking process as I like them dry to enjoy the true smoke and rub flavor.


FEC100 and FEPG1000
 
Posts: 227 | Location: Alma NE | Registered: November 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Grumpy Old Man
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Well Mr. Magoo here, see the post below, sorry.


Happy owner of a used SM150. WOW Cookshack, you outdid yourself.
 
Posts: 384 | Registered: February 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Grumpy Old Man
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quote:
Originally posted by BigMikeinNJ:
Boy fellas I've been awful quiet here lately - doing the right thing any newbie should be doing, reading threads, working on my technique and making sure no of my adult beverages go stale... Did up part of some (what Sams calls in Jersey) pork brisket ribs. Rubbed and soaked in a little Coke and fresh squeezed Tara Tara Oranges (look for them at Sams they are FINE) overnight. Then dried and reapplied my rub. Went in room temp to 225 for two hours, one small hunk of cherry wood, one of apple wood, flipped and sprayed with apple juice and cooked another 90 minutes. Then foiled with a little of my sauce mixed with honey (about 60/40) sealed them up meat side DOWN in that concoction for one hour at 250, then opened them up and cooked meat side UP at 250 another hour (got jawing with my Ma on the phone). Hoo weeee - or as someone here says Pigs Soooooo Wheeeeee... Got them wrapped in foil and a towel until Momma gets home. Got my mac salad and KFC Copy cole slaw made, made mac and cheese last night, all I gotta do is make some buttermilk biscuits and pour my adult beverage...

Thanks for all the hints and tips. It's a blast doing this.




Happy owner of a used SM150. WOW Cookshack, you outdid yourself.
 
Posts: 384 | Registered: February 02, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Well. I had 3 St. Louis style rib racks to smoke today(on sale...buy one get one free), and I fully intended to do the Rib Dog version with peach preserves. My taste buds were all set, and when I went into the fridge to get the jar of peach preserves, I discovered my grand daughter had used it all on her toast the past week. So I went with the flow and did the MaxQue version.

I lightly sprinkled the ribs with Lawry's Seasoned salt and rubbed with Rib Tickler BBQ Rub. Into the smoker at 275* for 3 hrs. Used the Johnny Trigg recipe described by MaxQue (foiled them meat down with 4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz pure maple syrup, spritz with Tiger Sauce. Squirted fairly heavily on the ribs. Put them into the smoker for another hour, foiled. Once unfoiled, I used RibDogs glaze (heated mixture of 4 parts barbecue sauce, 1 part honey, and no cayenne cause the Eagle Rub Hot Barbecue Sauce sent in the last rub/sauce exchange by Ismoke had enough heat...good stuff). I let them sit in the smoker unfoiled for another 15 minutes to set the glaze. Took them out and lightly covered them with foil for 20 minutes.

Absolutely scrumptous. A little overcooked cause they were falling off the bone. Left the house and got back to them a little late. However, they were moist and tasty. First Q in a month. Good to be back.

The fat was virtually totally rendered smoking the ribs at 275* all the way...also trimmed a lot of fat before cooking them. Best spare ribs to date. Total cook time was 4 hrs and 15 minutes. Apple wood.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Welcome back Pags!


Smoking on:
FEPG500
SM025
SM150
 
Posts: 1072 | Location: Santee Ca. | Registered: December 15, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sometimes I wonder if Johnny Trigg lurks the CS forum, sees this thread and says, "Dang...them boys is gettin pretty darn close." Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pags,
I've found that at 275 I foil @ 3 to 3&1/2 hours ala Trigg & rest them in a cooler. When ready to eat I finish off on my gas grill on high to crisp up and caramelize the sauce. Just be careful not to spill juices all over the place or burn them up on the grill.
Welcome back!
Joe M
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hello I am new here but in no way new to charcoal cooking. I tried the Trigg method discussed in this thread and didn't get the results that I though I should have. Followed the one method which was started with rib tickler rub and two hours on grill then one hour foil with parkay,brown sugar,honey & tiger sauce and then about 30 minutes back on grill. I am in the process of acquiring a better quality smoker but am using a char-grillers barrel now. I had a bit of trouble keeping temp constant and I am pretty sure that's what my problem was. Ribs were falling off of the bone and almost mushy. The temp gauge never got above 300 but I managed to keep it around 250-275 according to the gauge. Ribs were good but no where as good as "best ever". If any more time would have been used they would have been terrible. End result was overcooked I'm sure. I am looking to buy a good quality smoker but live in a rural area and no one around sells a high quality one.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: June 23, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Regarding smokers, FedEx will deliver your order from Cookshack.

Regarding foiling ribs, with temps over 225, you boil the liquid and steam the ribs. That's why they fall off of the bone.
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Joe M thanks for the tip. I noticed on that with Trigg's ribs they don't appear to be falling off the bone and when bit into they don't pull apart real easy. I will be getting a good quality smoker soon. Keeping the temp constant and low is key to doing great ribs.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: June 23, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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It's not the recipe. If the ribs don't pull clean then they are undercooked. Use Smokin's toothpick test to determine doneness. If the toothpick slides through the meat easily with no resistance, then the ribs are done. If not, cook another 20-30 minutes and retest.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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CraigM - I have a 6-7 year old Char-Griller hidden in my back yard...I couldn't give it away. Worst smoker I've ever used. It just won't hold smoke or heat due to the poor designm construction, etc. Great for grilling a dozen or so rib-eyes at @ time tho Big Grin

You're correct, good ribs (or any BBQ) requires a constant temp. "Low" is a matter of opinion. I smoke ribs at 275 on my FEC100 and 250 on my Amerique. IMHO the higher heats helpt render fat better.

Get yourself a reliable Cookshack...read Smokin's Ribs 101 and have at a few cooks. Once you've nailed the basics go back to the Trigg method and compare.

A perfectly cooked rib bite will come away from the bone cleanly, leaving an exposed, shiny looking bone behind.

PS Craig, welcome to the forum and check your private messages.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by CraigM:
Joe M thanks for the tip. I noticed on that with Trigg's ribs they don't appear to be falling off the bone and when bit into they don't pull apart real easy. I will be getting a good quality smoker soon. Keeping the temp constant and low is key to doing great ribs.
Thanks for the reply, That seems easy enough to test for doneness. I'm sure my problem was too high on the temp due to the grill. Any more time would have ruined the meat for sure. But practice is fun in this endeavor. I have been reading all the great post here and decided to join.Thanks again for the help.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: June 23, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by CraigM:
The temp gauge never got above 300 but I managed to keep it around 250-275 according to the gauge.


It doesn't matter what a temp gauge said! I was taught by a fine rib cook that a Pitmaster has to know the temps at the grate where he is cooking his ribs. That was solid advice, just like all the other advice I've ever gotten from Smokin'.
 
Posts: 2908 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the help. I'm sure my temp was much too hot.
 
Posts: 5 | Registered: June 23, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This is the greatest thread. I'm trying these out on Saturday. It's only the misses and me however, and she's a light eater. I'm trying to decide if I should smoke all 4 racks and freeze the leftovers, or freeze two racks as is.

I have a vacuum sealer. What is the trick to keeping smoked ribs moist and juicy when freezing? How do you heat them up?
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: November 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am no expert, but this has worked well for me. When the ribs come out of the foil cook them until they are no longer wet on the outside. I then take them off the smoker , and let them cool for 10 min. then vacuum pack and freeze while still warm. If you let them sit until they are completely cool they will be dry. When I am ready to use them I thaw them and put on a grill to finish. Just put a little sauce of choice on them, and let them cook until caramelized and they will be good. I have cooked 50 racks of ribs (St.Lois Cut) and had very good results. I hate to cook 1 or 2 racks at a time.
Good Luck
Gary


"If you were real busy, you wouldn't know I was Goofin Off"

Amerique
SM160
YS640
 
Posts: 70 | Location: Hutchinson, KS | Registered: March 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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New to the forum here, but not new to smoking...inspired here to try Trigg's recipe after seeing it on BBQ Pitmasters. Got all the right stuff with the exception of the rub (not enough time to order the rubs, and here in NJ, their idea of a good rub is...well...Delilah's Den in Atlantic City). Using some other sweet and savory rubs, in addition to Lowry's, first and will see how that goes. Thanks for all the great discussion! Will let you know how it goes.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Toms River, NJ | Registered: July 07, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Livin' the BBQ Dream
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Welcome BB,

Do we call you Big or Bully for short Wink

Rubs can be whatever you want. If you want to make one of your own, there are tons of good ones out there, just so many options.

Good luck, let us know how it goes.


Smokin Okie

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It's done when it's done
 
Posts: 14419 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA | Registered: January 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a Fast Eddy PG1000 pellet grill, am trying this rib recipe today for the first time. I just picked up a thermometer to put on the grill to test temps. The lowest the grill's setting is 170, but the temp on the grill is 220 - 225.
Anyone else able to get lower temps on this grill?
 
Posts: 8 | Registered: November 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by BigBully215:
New to the forum here, but not new to smoking...inspired here to try Trigg's recipe after seeing it on BBQ Pitmasters. Got all the right stuff with the exception of the rub (not enough time to order the rubs, and here in NJ, their idea of a good rub is...well...Delilah's Den in Atlantic City). Using some other sweet and savory rubs, in addition to Lowry's, first and will see how that goes. Thanks for all the great discussion! Will let you know how it goes.


Welcome BigBully215! Sounds like you need to sign up for the next Sauce and Rub Exchange. Next one is in the fall. In the meantime, there are a lot of good resources for rubs on the net and in BBQ cookbooks. If you Google FAST EDDY you'll find a recipe that he posted that won a championship. Have Fun!

PS VickiB is in NJ. Maybe she could point you in the right direction for some local stuff.
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Been using the 3-2-1 method for a couple years and was wondering with this method that you are talking about do you put the meat side down in the foil or is meat side up? Also do you not put any liquid into the foil? Thanks in advance going to smoke 4 racks on Saturday and I am dying to try out the peach perserve on these.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: July 09, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Meat side down. This is what I put into the foil...4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz maple syrup, and 1 teaspoon of Tiger Sauce. I actually use more but maintain the proper ratios.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When you say:

"Foiled them with 4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz maple syrup and a tbsp of Tiger Sauce. Cooked 'em meat side down for 45 minutes. Removed them from foil, painted them with home brewed Que sauce and gave them 15 more minutes."

Is that for each rack or is that for three racks.

thanks
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: April 16, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So the ribs, according to three of the people at the party, were "the best they ever had." I couldn't believe how perfect they were, and we're having the leftovers tonight. I used a mixture of sweet and savory rubs I doctored up on my own, and in the Trigg Wrap, I put in honey, onion powder, Parkay, and the Tiger Sauce. I thought they would be too sweet, especially with the glaze I made, but they came out perfect.

Definitely looking into entering a competition here in Jersey because I want to know how I stack up. I love watching people eat all my barbecue, so I'm going to see if I can make this my true calling.

As for what to call me, Bully is best, but I'm a nice guy. I had a bulldog for 13 years, and I just love the breed. New one coming soon!

Thanks for everything. Nancy, if you can point me to some good stuff here in the nation's armpit, I'd greatly appreciate it!!!

Bully out!
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Toms River, NJ | Registered: July 07, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rhoot,

I LOVE this method. I have switched from loin backs to St. Louis trimmed spares using this method. I have cooked the Trigg/MaxQ/Pags Rib method for over 2 dozens cooks. I use Parkay squeeze margarine and I go equal parts of magarine/Brown sugar/Maple syrup and I add enough Tiger sauce to give it the Zing Im looking for. I then put the mixed glaze back into the empty Parkay bottles (I keep 3 or so marked "Rib Glaze"). When I foil, I just squirt enough on each side to coat. I put 1 rack to each foiling. If I dont use all the glaze, I just put it in the fridge until the next cook. I then pour the "Old glaze" into the container with the fresh batch and then back into the squirt bottles...... My neighbors now make appearances whenever I fire the smoker up... Wink


__________________________
Happy AmeriQue and FEC 100 owner and lusting after a CB036 Char Broiler!!

So much wine, so little time.....
 
Posts: 324 | Location: Brandon, Mississippi | Registered: October 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Each racks receives its portion of the "sauce". The proportions shown above should handle 3 racks. I use a little heavier, but make enough to cook 9 or 10 racks and save it in squirt bottles.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Very first time cooking ribs-ever. A friend gave me 3 slabs of baby backs. Used a variation of the techniques in this thread. Didn't have Rib Tickler so used a rub from a local gourmet market. Found a BBQ sauce that I'd never heard of and it was quite excellent- Funny Bones original. Followed most of the rest of the directions.

I was a bit concerned with the margarine based sauce as my grocer didn't have Parkay, but some fancy weird margarine. Turned out good anyway.

Bottom line: it was outstanding! Wife said it was as good if not better than the ribs she had in Memphis, and that says something.

My thanks to Rib Dog, MaxQ,Pags, and Johnny Trigg! for their recipes and time to put it on this thread for us to follow. Here's a pic of the final product. It's after 11pm, so we'll have to really tear into them tomorrow!

Imagephoto3a.JPG (238 Kb, 88 downloads)
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Glad you liked them Victor. Johnny Trigg didn't contribute. We were just trying to copy his method. Big Grin
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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How much did those racks originally weigh?

How long did you smoke them before foiling and at what temp?

How long in foil?

Reason I ask...they look overdone. Photos can deceive so I thought I'd ask.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know, but I thought I'd give some credit anyway!

quote:
Originally posted by Pags:
Glad you liked them Victor. Johnny Trigg didn't contribute. We were just trying to copy his method. Big Grin
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I don't know what they weighed, sorry. I didn't buy them and didn't weigh them. They touched both sides of the smoker when sitting on the shelf. In smoke 1 hour @180, 2 hrs @275, then in foil for 1 hr @275. Sprayed every hour w/ apple juice (except when in foil).

They were definitely not overdone or dry. Very tender and juicy.


quote:
Originally posted by MaxQ:
How much did those racks originally weigh?

How long did you smoke them before foiling and at what temp?

How long in foil?

Reason I ask...they look overdone. Photos can deceive so I thought I'd ask.
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by easy victor:
They touched both sides of the smoker when sitting on the shelf.

A tip I learned from Smokin's video is to scrunch the ribs together on the shelf. This helps them to cook more evenly.
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There wasn't much room between the strips! Maybe 1/4 inch. But I'll mash 'em next time!
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just so there's no confusion, leave space between each rack to allow air circulation. Grab both ends and push together so they are not stretched out.
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In that case, I think they were just fine. It wasn't a matter of being stretched out- they were just too long for the width of my AQ!
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Joe M:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by easy victor:
They touched both sides of the smoker when sitting on the shelf.

A tip I learned from Smokin's video is to scrunch the ribs together on the shelf. This helps them to cook more evenly.


I started doing that after watching Smokin's video too! Makes for thick, moist ribs. When judging comps, I note that most comp cooks seem to do this also.


"Live life while you are alive, because when you're dead, you're dead a long time"-Roland Michael Curtis
 
Posts: 875 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: June 14, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In a pickle, and have a question.

Doing ribs tomorrow, and I won't have time to go out and get margarine. Will butter work as a substitute?

Thanks.
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by easy victor:
In a pickle, and have a question.

Doing ribs tomorrow, and I won't have time to go out and get margarine. Will butter work as a substitute?

Thanks.


I've never tried butter but it should be fine. If you finish on the grill, be sure not to burn them.
Let us know how they turn out.
 
Posts: 673 | Location: Charleston, SC | Registered: June 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Me thinks the butter will work also.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Butter should be OK. That said, the whey componant of butter (milk solids) will burn and brown at 350 degrees. A pre-caution would be to clarify the butter but since the internal foil pouch temp should be well under the 350 o mark, you should be fine.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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^^^^^ Technocrat. Smiler
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The butter worked just fine. And the ribs came out amazing- as usual!

Thanks for your assistance.
 
Posts: 104 | Location: Motown aka Hockeytown | Registered: May 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Well. After half dozen KISS methods for the loin back...ribs, rub, smoke. I decided it was time to bring out this recipe again since my son, daughter in law and new grandson (5 weeks) are coming over for dinner. Same recipe as below but with Rib Tickler instead of Dr. B's BBQ rub and Kinder's Mild in the glaze instead of the Memphis. Using what's available. Looking forward to a nice treat. If I remember I'll take a couple pictures.

quote:
Originally posted by Pags:
Well. We had the ribs tonight. Followed a combination of MaxQue's and Ribdog's recipes.

I lightly sprinkled with Lawry's Seasoned salt and rubbed with Dr. Barbecue's BBQ Rub. Into the smoker at 180* for an hour then kicked up to 275* for 2 hrs. Used the Johnny Trigg recipe as described by MaxQue(foiled them meat down with 4 oz margarine, 4 oz brown sugar, 2 oz maple syrup and a tbsp of Tiger Sauce combined and squirted fairly heavily on them. I did 3 racks and had enough of this stuff for a couple more racks). Put them into the smoker for another hour. After I foiled, I used RibDogs glaze (heated mixture of 4 parts Memphis barbecue sauce, 1 part honey, and just a few sprinkles of cayenne. If you can taste the heat, you used too much). I let them sit in the smoker unfoiled for another 15 minutes to set the glaze. Took them out and double heavy duty foil/beach towel for 20 minutes.

OMG. Best ribs yet. Four other people ate them. Got 2 "best ever". A "these are awesome". And a "did you take good notes" from the little woman.

Thanks MaxQue and RibDog for all the help. They were moist, smokey (I used a packet of cherry pellets and 2 chunks of hickory), flavorful, sweet with a slight spice followup. Glad I started the post cause my attempt would have missed the target. The Johnny Trigg technique and the glaze combined nicely.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Coincidently, I'm doing a test batch of SL Spares this afternoon in advance of the Royal cook-off next weekend.

Pouch > brown sugar, Tiger, AJ and Memphis...pretty much my goto pouch. I don't care for the Parkay & never understood the benefit.

The new change-up is the finishing glaze. Equal parts Head Country, honey & Blues Hog Smokey Mtn Sauce, which I scored during the sauce/rub exchange. Will report back with pics and after action summary.
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Well. Wouldn't you know it. I didn't take pictures. Everyone was starving so I removed the ribs from the smoker, removed the foil, tented the ribs for 15 minutes, cut them up and served.

They were exceptional. I used a pouch of cherry pellets plus a chunk of wild cherry wood with the smoke flavor spot on. Slight sweet with a bit of kick, the ribs were flavorful. They did start to fall off the bone so I should have removed them a little earlier, but we were very pleased with them. After a few more KISS, we'll do this one again.

Damn...these smokers do a great job on loin backs.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Turn-in box sans bling.

Last minute switch on the glaze...didn't care for the Blues Hog flavor. I went with Jack Daniels Hickory brown Sugar + Head Country + honey. Was very happy with the results. Mr. Trigg...watch out...Max is comin to Kansas Smiler
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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You go guy!!! Picture is worth a thousand words. Perfect score on presentation.

My ribs always turn out darker. I like the mahogany color of yours. Should I be foiling my ribs sooner? Flavor on mine was great.

Funny thing. I made a last minute switch and used Jack Daniels BBQ sauce in my glaze. Very tasty.
 
Posts: 4858 | Location: Roseville, CA | Registered: February 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Question on the "foiling" of the ribs:
Do you completely wrap the foil around ribs and crimp top together, or is the foil formed just like a pan - open at top with ribs & sauce sitting in it?
 
Posts: 189 | Location: Olympia, WA | Registered: September 05, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Wow Max! Nine to you on appearance!!! And I bet the taste was there also.

Regarding box bling: I hear Florida BBQ Association doesn't use box bling, just meat in the box. Speaking as a CBJ, after carefully picking off box bling stuck to BBQ at KCBS comps I like the idea of just meat, no bling. It doesn't take long for the flavors of box bling to creep into the BBQ.


"Live life while you are alive, because when you're dead, you're dead a long time"-Roland Michael Curtis
 
Posts: 875 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: June 14, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by Nodrog:
Question on the "foiling" of the ribs:
Do you completely wrap the foil around ribs and crimp top together, or is the foil formed just like a pan - open at top with ribs & sauce sitting in it?


If I'm wrapping ribs, yes they are wrapped around and the foil is folded on the top, then the ends folded up(totally enclosing the ribs). This process is then done again with a second layer of foil. Personally, I try to make sure there is not a lot of dead space between the ribs and the foil. I think this can cause the ribs to be steamed/drained of the natural juices....that's just me though!


@MaxQ...nice job cutting the ribs!
 
Posts: 2908 | Location: freeman,missouri | Registered: December 18, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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@Pags When I foil, I do so at which point the ribs have good color...usually around the 2 hr mark. The darker color you're getting is consistant with an electric smoker.

@Nodrog I was taught to tightly foil the ribs when using pouch ingredients. Some cooks foil at the end...to tac a glaze, in which case foil over the top of the pan is applied.

@SmokinM I share your thoughts as to no bling/meat only. Until all sanctioning authorities get on the same page, I'm afraid the dreaded parsley will be glued to your samplings Frowner

Thanks for the comments guys...much appreciated. Now if only Coach can shore up his end with brisket and chicken Smiler <grins, ducks & runs>
 
Posts: 2440 | Location: Woodstock, VT | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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