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Okay, to get everyone to think a little more about basic rubs and sauces, we're starting a new series -- rubs made through the contributions of the forum members.

First we'll talk ingredients, then make it, test it rework it and see how it goes.

This post is for CHICKEN RUB. Savory, not too spicey.

So, please post ingredients you think should be in the rub and if possible quantities and we'll build a base.

Try to let us know why something should be included and why.

My thoughts are to spend time learning about rubs and their ingredients.

Fire away.
Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

A poultry rub that I've "assembled" over time, borrowing from a number of recipes and tweaking to my personal preferences, is as follows:

3/4 cup paprika (smoked Spanish preferred)
1/4 cup coarse salt
1/4 cup light brown sugar
1/4 cup crushed black pepper
2 tbs onion powder
2 tbs garlic powder
2 tbs lemon zest (dried for a few minutes in a barely warm oven)
1 tbs dry thyme
1 tbs dry sage
1 tbs dry mustard (Colemans preferred)

Mix in a bowl and rub under and over the skin. Add 1 or 2 tbs to the cavity and rub.
Looks really good dls, not really looking for someone else's already existing recipe to modify, really looking to create one from scratch and help everyone through the process of learning how to do rubs.

Like what spices to be in there would be good and maybe what not.

I could post 100's of chicken rubs, but that kinds defeats the fun of learning to do one.

For example, on my list of don't adds will be don't add paprika or any powders (will have to wait for my post to see why).
I'll second the vote for herbs in chicken, so we can discuss which ones.

Everyone for Rosemary, thyme, oregano, majoran, so is there a standard blend of these we can use.

Well Russ I'm not "directing", just thinking. Actually I wanted to discuss the use of "powders" in rubs. Just real busy for a few days, but basically I'm not a fan of powders, I just think the "flavor" get's lost in rubs.

Like Garlic. Do we use Garlic salt, garlic powder, granulated garlic, fresh garlic, etc, etc.

I think we should try to make this accessible for most people. Not necessarily from the local grocery store for the stuff, but common enough on the internet spice stores. We can discuss why if we need to.
There is a reasoning that sometimes the more you add,the less you gain.

There is usually the goal of balance among sweet,heat,and salt.

Possibly, a hint of one favorite,might leave the eater thoughtfully wondering "what is that one direction of flavor"?

If the mouth has three varieties of heat receptors,the Cajuns would suggest that red,black,and white pepper each stimulates different ones.

Does anything, more finely ground than granulated garlic and onion,allow you to control distribution?

Does just that touch of flavor,from a fruitwood,give bland poultry the boost it needs?

Do we think poultry benefits from a little up front sweet,and a touch of slightly lingering back heat?

Do we plan to adjust salt,or sweet,with a glaze -after cooking?

Do we cook very hot,where sugar in the rub will burn ?

Do we use salt water injected fowl,where we must reduce the salt in the rub?

Yep Smokin',inquiring minds want to know. Confused
quote:
Originally posted by C'Nooga:
[qb] I say throw one or two tablespoons of Old Bay in that bad boy rub.

So, if I'm reading this recipe right, we have:

Mustard, Misc. Herbs, Garlic, White Pepper, Brown Sugar, and Old Bay....

BRB, going to mix some up..........

C'Nooga [/qb]
Looks good so far!, I was going to suggest White Pepper for the delayed heat in the back of the mouth, but it was already mentioned. Do we want some onion powder??


dan
myself i like to add dried mustard and for me it has to be colemans as it seems to be the most consistant. i like to add a small amount of sweet orange habanero rub from homebbq.com just to give it a tiny heat kick along with a background sweet taste. lemon pepper is also nice as a more assertive upfront flavor. i also like to add a tiny amount of bells seasoning to give a more rounded mouth feel.
jack
These are strictly the thoughts from a amateur trying to learn a little more about rubs, but if I were to apply the same technique as I do when trying new sausage recipes I would start out with the following 3 step or catagory process:

Catagory 1:
Salt and sugar seem to be the base for just about any rub, sauce, brine etc. So I might throw in 1 TBS of kosher or sea salt and 1 TBS of turbinado or brown sugar.

Catagory 2:
Next would come the spices that most of us use darn near everyday, whether we know it or not. I would start out with 1 tsp. each of these. Since it sounds like we are looking for a course rub I would buy seeds so they could be cracked in the pepper mill to the desired consistancy. These would be ingredients like black pepper corns, white pepper corns, coriander, & mustard seed. This catagory would also include the granulated garlic and dehydrated mince onion.

Catagory 3:
Lastly. The exotic herbs to give it that individule taste. Your rosemary, majoram, basil, tarregon, thyme, and oregano. Grated lemon peel, grated orange peel, & coconut are included here as well. With these I would start out with 1/2 tsp of ea.

By the way, I'm not suggesting we have to use everything mentioned or can't use something not listed.

The theory behind this is once you have added your ingredients from cat. 2 to cat. 1 you can decide if its too strong and more salt and sugar need added. Or visa versa. Then by adding the small amounts (unless your alergic to it a 1/2 tsp of anything shouldn't ruin your day.) of ingredients from cat. 3 you can continue to tweek it until you have the right amount.

Just my thoughts because I'm too cheap to be wasting spices that cost $4.00 a bottle or more. Isn't it funny how they just keep getting more expensive from cat. 1 thru cat. 3?

Sorry for rambling.
Smokin'

Not to be a naysayer, but I think this task handled in this forum, is going to be something similar to getting a bill passed in congress. I might be wrong, but you've got regional tastes, old-timers and new-timers, democrats and republicans, comp cooks and backyarders all trying to formulate one killer rub.

Perhaps you should determine the base recipe of the rub and we could each build from there on an individual basis? Each individual could finalize their rub and post it on here along with the final product evaluation in hopes that others may try it and enjoy.

What ya think? Just my .48 cents worth

Let me know what ya think. Do you see the same thing happening in this thread?

Tks,
C'Nooga
Lots of great ideas so far, I promise I'll review the posts to this point and respond, but probably won't be until tomorrow, as it's a REAL busy week at work.

AND

I come into the forum and a chinese herb merchant posted about 60 threads I had to delete Frowner so bear with me, I'm really not trying to be mean, really Big Grin

Well 'Nooga, you do have a point, but I think you missed mine. As for building a base and each coming up with a variation, I'm not interested. There are 1,000's of rubs out on the internet to try.

We Can however have our rub, as I'm just trying to come up with a rub for the forum to create, not build every version known to all. From our basic rub everyone can make their own adjustments if they want.

I've been moderating for over 5 years now and see the same kinds of posts over and over and just throught I'd post a new type of topic to challenge the forum members that have been asking about making their own rubs.

So what if it's challenging and we have to work through it, that's part of the challenge and the fun. Just think of me as the Speaker of the House and trying to push a bill through. We HAVE to have a poultry rub, so we'll all help figure one out.

As always, if the topic interests you, just jump in with your thoughts about the rub and how we can make it happen.

Russ
I've had zero time, sorry some weeks are like that. I was hoping that everyone would be able to jump in and discuss and talk through it, but doesn't look like it.

Hope to get some time tonight or tomorrow, but family things come first.

Since I started this, I need to jump in and kind of summarize what we have to this point and give some thoughts about the next steps.

If anyone has thoughts, please jump in, as I don't like always having to drive these topics, I was hoping to see some talk back and forth Frowner
Well, I through a few things together. The sniffer test and the finger tasting test tell me it might have a future. But since there wasnt a piece of chicken anywhere in the house I have yet to do a real test.

I hope intrest is rekendled in this. Its a whole new aspect of Que for me. I've always relied on commercial outlets for my rubs.
On to the next step. Now that we�ve talked ingredients, let�s talk details. The purpose of the thread is to talk about ingredients and how to build your own rub, if there isn�t enough participation, then the thread will just go away, so please feel free to hop in and comment (hint, hint)

I'll try to keep it going, but it's up to use to build it.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Read through the post and let�s discuss by categories and see what we want in the rub.

Purpose of this is for everyone to learn a little and experiment and report back your experiences. If you REALLY don�t like a particular ingredient, why not try it once and report back what you didn�t like.

Whole vs. Powders

My personal preference is to use other than powders. I think it rubs, the size of the granule will make a difference and in rubs I think powders just don�t add the oomph that large size, such as granules or grind you own

Fresh vs. Ground

This has to do with the age of the spice. When I grind my own, I know when I made the rub. Go to your supermarket and buy these spices and you�ll have no idea how long they�ve been in there.

Blends

I'd suggest we stay away from blends like "lemmon pepper" and possibly Old Bay. There is such inconsistency in these rubs that it's hard to get us all with the same one (and many times they already have salt/sugar in them and will throw out balance off)

Questions from above:

� Do we plan to adjust salt, or sweet, with a glaze -after cooking? First we cook with just the rub, no sauces, to develop a standalone rub
� Do we cook very hot, where sugar in the rub will burn? Since this is CS forum, we�ll be safe as we�re cooking at 250 or below. For those of us that cook at higher temps, we�ll have to adjust ourselves
� Do we use salt water injected fowl, where we must reduce the salt in the rub? No solution added chicken if possible, no brines, etc, during testing

Method.

I think GeiyserQ is spot on with the 3 step approach. GREAT idea.

You can buy them wherever you want, local or internet for testing, just let us know which you did

Category 1:
Salt and sugar seem to be the base for just about any rub, sauce, brine etc. So I might throw in 1 TBS of kosher or sea salt and 1 TBS of turbinado or brown sugar.

FOR YOUR COMMENTS, PLEASE ADDRESS WHAT YOU DO AND DON�T LIKE IN THIS AS WELL AS RECOMMENED QUANTITY TO START


� Salt
� No Salt
� Granulated Brown Sugar
� Paprika

Category 2:

FOR YOUR COMMENTS, PLEASE ADDRESS WHAT YOU DO AND DON�T LIKE IN THIS AS WELL AS RECOMMENED QUANTITY TO START

Next would come the spices that most of us use darn near everyday, whether we know it or not. I would start out with 1 tsp. each of these. Since it sounds like we are looking for a course rub I would buy seeds so they could be cracked in the pepper mill to the desired consistency. These would be ingredients like black pepper corns, white pepper corns, coriander, & mustard seed. This category would also include the granulated garlic and dehydrated mince onion.

� Garlic Powder or Salt or Granulated
� Onion Powder or Salt or Granulated
� Mustard Powder (Coleman�s)
� Red/Black/White Pepper

Category 3:

FOR YOUR COMMENTS, PLEASE ADDRESS WHAT YOU DO AND DON�T LIKE IN THIS AS WELL AS RECOMMENED QUANTITY TO START

Lastly. The exotic herbs to give it that individual taste. Your rosemary, marjoram, basil, tarragon, thyme, and oregano. Grated lemon peel, grated orange peel, & coconut are included here as well. With these I would start out with 1/2 tsp of ea.

� Rosemary
� Thyme
� Oregano
� Marjoram
� Old Bay
� Lemon Pepper
� Lemon Peel (grated or dehydrated)
� Horseradish powder
� Bells Seasoning
� Cumin
� Sage
� Cinnamon

Enjoy Big Grin
My comments:

Category one:

I'll agree with salt and sugar, but I'm getting to be less of a fan of Paprika. Been researching a lot and in another forum we've talked about how this can get a "burnt" taste and I'll agree. I vote to leave it out, but hey, I can be overruled if everyone else likes it.

I'd suggest a 1/4 cup of table salt (kosher is too coarse) and 1/4 of granulated brown sugar or turbinado

Category two

I like all of these, especially the three peppers.

I'd suggest a TB of Granulated garlic and Granulated onion and a tb of the others

Category three

I'm still thinking about these
For category 1, I only like salt and brown sugar, and in equal amounts. I usually start with a half cup of each. I put paprika in with category 2. Sometimes I use it, sometimes I don't. I usually use 1/8 cup each of: garlic powder, onion powder, mustard powder, black pepper, 1 TBLS. of ground red pepper. I don't use paprika on chicken, but when I include it in a rub, it is usually the same amount as the black pepper. In category 3, I would not use all of these in the same rub. For chicken, I would use 1 TBLS. each of sage and cumin, half that of thyme, marjoram, and rosemary. I think the flavor starts to go more toward a generic rub when too many different spices are added together.
Just a quick reference for those that may want to make either a larger or a smaller quantity of rub than what some might post.

3 tsp = 1 TBS

4 TBS = 1/4 cup

2 TBS = 1 oz.

4 oz. = 1/2 cup

With that said I vote we take Smokin's 1/4 cup each of salt & sugar, and add 1 TBS each of cracked black pepper, cracked mustard seed, & granulated garlic.

We can wait until after the catagory 3 selections
before deciding if we want the other heat sources of white & red peppers or even (against Smokin's opinion) paprika.

Forward progress!
Hey Everyone, Where did this "project" go?? I just found this thread and I think the concept is truly amazin. I love watching the "more experianced" develope a rub. I for one prefer to make my own rather than simply buy it. For me it adds to the overall satisfaction of cooking great food.

I compete in some Chili cookoffs around the area and love it for the same reasons everyone loves the BBQ competitions. I do have a question as why in many recipes chili powders are not used for a heat source. In "some" cases they are more flavorfull than the black,red, white peppers.

To bring this all back to the purpose of this thread what is the consensus about adding ANCHO CHILI (mild heat, sweet smokey flavor) to bring some heat/flavor?

It is ok to be critical I have tough skin and a desire to create unique flavors.

Thanks
I think when you to get to the SW ,you see more brisket rubs with some chile powders.

There is a lot of chipolte powder,and even some hab powder being used around the country.

Many of the chile powders,seem to work better with some liquid base for the flavors to develop.

Also some chile powders can burn with long dry heat,as they can with high heats in a saute pan.

Paprikas exhibit some of the same problems.

This can leave bitter aftertaste.

In shorter cooks,i.e. chicken,the chile powders with citrus juices tend to flavor up enough to make marinades,bastes,glazes,sauces.

The darkness of color,and the volume you need to use of anchos, probably influences the amount of them used.

Nothing scientific,just a couple of thoughts.
I figure the concept for the thread is dead, a month went by and no one commented. It was a good thought, just not enough interest and I can't drive it all the time Wink

Given the large amount of rubs out there, guess there wasn't enough interest.

I'll leave it up to others if they want to continue it, but with contests starting in a month, you missed my 2 free hours in February I had to help.
I have included a collection of interesting Beer Butt Chicken recipes for use with a Beer Can Cooker. You may use your own recipe or just lather that bird with your favorite Bar-B-Q Sauce and let that bird squat over a can of your favorite beer or soda. Some of these recipes I found on the Internet, others have been swapped over campfires chili and barbecue cook-offs for years. Good luck and enjoy your Drunk�n Bird!
Just so you know that all cookers and ovens cook differently. A little experimentation will go a long way. Don�t open and close your cooker too often or you will just add to the cook time and also may cook all of the liquid out of your beer can, leaving the chicken dry and defeat the purpose of using beer. A potato or onion in the neck cavity will lock in the moisture giving you a very tender and juicy chicken.

Schwab City Drunk Chicken

INGREDIENTS
1 chicken
1 red onion
1 can of your favorite beer
Tex-Joy steak seasoning
zesty Italian dressing
1-2 sliced jalapeno peppers (optional)
a dash or two Worcestershire sauce

Directions
Clean cavity of whole chicken of any liver, etc.
Season chicken with desired amount of Tex-Joy steak seasoning.
Stuff peeled red onion into empty chicken cavity.
(Shove onion as far as possible into cavity.)
Pour desired amount of zesty Italian dressing into cavity, over onion.
Dash a little Worcestershire sauce. (I prefer several dashes)
Place 1-2 pods of garlic into chicken, depending on taste.
Open beer can and insert beer into cavity.
(Set the chicken on top of open beer can.)
Build a good fire in any size bar-b-Que. pit.
Let fire die to a hot bed of coals.
Place chicken on grill using indirect heat to cook the bird.
Make sure you stand it up as if sitting on can. Let chicken cook until done.
When chicken is done all the way through, take off pit. (Pierce the chicken when it appears that the bird is fully cooked. Juices will run clear when the bird is done.)
Chicken will have absorbed almost all of the beer flavor via the steam.
Take can out before serving. This will be the juiciest chicken you ever sunk your teeth into. The onion you inserted can easily be served as a side dish. Good eating and we hope you enjoy.


Drunken Chicken in a Field

INGREDIENTS
1 3-4 lb. chicken
1 outdoor grill
some thyme
1/2 cup white wine
1 clove garlic
8 oz jar orange marmalade
1 large orange
some salt
8-12 strips bacon
1 beer can
1 stick butter
enough wild rice to make a field to place your chicken

Directions
Melt the butter and garlic in saucepan.
After bird has been cleaned and dried, brush bird with the garlic butter sauce
Insert the peeled orange into the neck of the chicken to trap the steam as it rises from the can.
Place strips of bacon across the outside of chicken, attach with toothpicks.
Mix the wine marmalade and remaining seasonings in a bowl, then pour into the can of choice, then place in can holder and put on grill over indirect heat.
Place the bird over the can so that its legs help it stand as if on a tripod.
The heat from the fire will allow the wine marmalade mixture to steam the birds as they cook for about one hour or until the juices run clear when the bird is poked with sharp knife.


Smoked Herb Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (4 pound) whole chicken
� � stick of butter
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
� 1 tablespoon fresh chives, finely chopped
� 1 12 or 16oz beer about � full


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat and smoke using your favorite wood.
Rinse chicken inside and out. Pat dry. Loosen skin around the breast area.
Place the mix spices/herbs together and place half under the skin and the other half inside the chicken.
Put the butter in the beer can along with the � can of beer.
Place chicken over the beer can
Cook chicken with smoke for 4 hours or until juices run clear when poked with a fork.


Hot Garlic Chick

INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (3 pound) chicken
� garlic powder to taste
� ground black pepper to taste
� Seasoned salt to taste
� 1 (12 fluid ounce) can beer
� 1/2 cup butter
� 2 tablespoons garlic powder
� 1 tablespoon Cayenne pepper, or more if you want a real hot chick!
� 1 tablespoon
� 1 whole onion

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat grill for medium
In a microwave-safe bowl, combine the beer, butter, 1-tablespoon garlic powder and seasoned pepper. Heat in the microwave for 1 or 2 minutes, or until butter is melted and mixture is hot. Set aside.
Season chicken generously with the garlic powder, ground black pepper and seasoned salt to taste. Any seasonings not used up until this point place in beer can with beer.
Place chicken onto the beer can so that the open cavity completely engulfs the can. Insert onion into the neck cavity of the chicken to trap in the flavorful steam. Place over indirect heat in grill and cook for about 1-1/2 hours.
Pierce the chicken when it appears that the bird is fully cooked. Juices will run clear when the bird is done.


Lawry�s Beer Butt Chicken

INGREDIENTS:
� 1whole 3-4lb chicken
� 2 tablespoons Bertolli� Extra Virgin Olive Oil
� 1 tablespoon Lawry's� Seasoned Salt
� 1 teaspoon Lawry's� Seasoned Pepper
� 3 limes, cut into quarters
� 1 tablespoon Lawry's� Garlic Salt With Parsley
� 1 can of your favorite beer (you may substitute cider for the beer)

DIRECTIONS:
In large bowl, toss chicken with oil, Seasoned Salt and Seasoned Pepper.
Squeeze lime quarters allowing the juice to collect in a bowl.
Place chicken onto the open beer can so that the open cavity completely engulfs the can. Insert onion into the neck cavity of the chicken to trap in the flavorful steam. Place over indirect heat in grill and cook for about 1-1/2 hours.
Brush on prepared lime juice over chicken during the cooking process. Remember when you open and close the grill you are allowing the heat and steam to escape therefore increasing the cooking time.
Pierce the chicken when it appears that the bird is fully cooked. Juices will run clear when the bird is done.


Mexican chick
INGREDIENTS:
� 2 tablespoons pineapple juice
� 1 teaspoon lime juice
� 1 clove garlic, minced
� 1 pinch saffron
� 4 teaspoons salt
� 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
� 1 (3 pound) whole chicken
� 1 can of your favorite beer
� 1 whole onion

DIRECTIONS:
In a large bowl, mix all of the ingredients (except the saffron, salt and pepper) together and pour into beer can using a funnel. Rub the bird down with the remaining ingredients.
Preheat grill for medium heat.
Place chicken onto the open beer can so that the open cavity completely engulfs the can. Insert onion into the neck cavity of the chicken to trap in the flavorful steam. Place over indirect heat in grill and cook for about 1-1/2 hours.
Pierce the chicken when it appears that the bird is fully cooked. Juices will run clear when the bird is done.


Beer butt


INGREDIENTS:
� 1 cup butter
� 2 tablespoons garlic salt
� 2 tablespoons paprika
� salt and pepper to taste
� 1 (12 fluid ounce) can beer
� 1 (4 pound) whole chicken


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat.
In a small skillet, melt 1/2-cup butter. Mix in 1-tablespoon garlic salt, 1-tablespoon paprika, salt, and pepper.
Discard 1/2 the beer, leaving the remainder in the can. Add remaining butter, garlic salt, paprika, and desired amount of salt and pepper to beer can. Place can on a disposable baking sheet. Set chicken on can, inserting can into the cavity of the chicken. Baste chicken with the melted, seasoned butter.
Place baking sheet with beer and chicken on the prepared grill. Cook over low heat for about 3 hours or until internal temperature of chicken reaches 180 degrees F (80 degrees C).


Barbecue Lime

INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (4 pound) chicken, cut into pieces
� 2 teaspoons seasoning salt
� 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
� 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
� 1 1/2 cups fresh lime juice
� 1 cup olive oil
� 8 cloves garlic, minced
� 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
DIRECTIONS:
Wash chicken parts. Pat dry thoroughly. Pierce all pieces with a fork. In a small bowl, combine the seasoning salt, ground black pepper and cayenne pepper. Rub all chicken parts with the spices, and then place the chicken into a large, re-sealable plastic bag.
In a separate medium bowl, combine the lime juice, olive oil, garlic and cilantro. Mix well and pour into the bag with the chicken. Seal and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours.
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat and lightly oil grate.
Remove chicken from the refrigerator and pour marinade into a small saucepan over medium high heat. Bring to a boil for about 1 to 2 minutes.


Tipsy chick
This is not a beer butt recipe, but since beer is utilized, I have included it in this list.

INGREDIENTS:
� 6 cups water
� 2 cups beer
� 1/8 cup salt
� 1 teaspoon garlic powder
� 1 teaspoon onion powder
� 1 (3 pound) whole chicken
� hickory or mesquite wood chips
� 2 tablespoons ground cumin
� 2 tablespoons curry powder (I prefer the Thai Curry as it has a more friendly flavor in my opinion)
� 2 tablespoons chili powder, divided
� 1 tablespoon pepper
� 1 teaspoon salt
� 1/2 teaspoon paprika
� 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper


DIRECTIONS:
Combine brine ingredients - water, beer, 1/8 cup salt, garlic powder, and onion powder - in a large container, one that is large enough to hold the brine and the chicken. Soak whole chicken in brine for 1 hour.
Soak wood chips in water for 1 hour.
Preheat grill for indirect cooking method. Place wood chips over coals when ready to cook.
In a small bowl, combine cumin, curry, chili powder, pepper, 1-teaspoon salt, paprika, and cayenne pepper. Rub chicken inside and out with spice mixture.
Place chicken on grill, breast side down. Close lid, and cook for 30 minutes. Turn over, and cook for an additional 25 minutes, or until juices run clear and temperature is 185 degrees in the thickest part of the chicken. Keep the lid closed while cooking for even cooking, and to get more of that smoky flavor.


Citrus smoked
This is not a beer butt recipe, but since beer is utilized, I have included it in this list.


INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (6 pound) whole chicken
� 4 cups lemon-lime flavored carbonated beverage
� 1 tablespoon garlic powder
� 2 cups wood chips, soaked


DIRECTIONS:
Place the whole chicken into a large re sealable plastic bag. Sprinkle in garlic powder, and then pour in enough lemon-lime soda to cover the bird. Seal the bag, and place in the refrigerator overnight to marinate.
Light charcoal in an outdoor smoker, and wait until the temperature is at 225 degrees F (110 degrees C).
Remove chicken from the bag, and place on the grill grates. Discard marinade. Cover, and cook for 10 hours (this is not my recipe, I would suggest smoking for about 4 hours). Occasionally toss a handful of soaked wood chips on the coals.


Beer butt

This chicken is the juiciest, most mouthwatering bird you'll ever try. I also like the aspect of theater when you cook it, because it looks so damned weird on the grill, people will wonder what brand of crack you switched to.

INGREDIENTS:
1 Whole Chicken (3-4 lbs.)
1 6 pack of your favorite beer 1 for chicken 5 for you (16oz)
Olive Oil
3-4 Cloves of Garlic (Crushed)
Salt and Pepper or your favorite BBQ rub
Fresh Basil
A few pinches of Cayenne Pepper

DIRECTIONS:
Start with a hot grill (coals all white and ready to cook). Drink about 1/4 of that can of beer. Set it aside 3/4 full and have a couple of full ones, real beer this time�no sissy canned stuff.
Get the chicken ready for cookin'. Trim some of the fat, get rid of the giblets (here kitty kitty!). Rub liberally with your favorite meat rub. I prefer olive oil, basil, lots of fresh pressed garlic, salt, and a pinch of cayenne. Some folks like Zartarain's or some such store bought concoction, but whatever.
Get a can opener or some such tool and open up the top of the can and drop in the crushed garlic.
Oil up the can and lower that chicken over top of it. The beer can goes into the chicken's body cavity and allows the bird to stand upright.
Cover your grill and cook the chicken until its wings are loose and the skin turns clear.


Beer Can Bird

INGREDIENTS:
1 (4-pound) whole chicken
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons of your favorite dry spice rub
1 can beer
DIRECTIONS:
Remove neck and giblets from chicken and discard. Rinse chicken inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Rub chicken lightly with oil then rub inside and out with salt, pepper and dry rub. Set aside.
Open beer can and take several gulps (make them big gulps so that the can is half full). Place beer can on a solid surface. Grabbing a chicken leg in each hand, plunk the bird cavity over the beer can. Transfer the bird-on-a-can to your grill and place in the center of the grate, balancing the bird on its 2 legs and the can like a tripod.
Cook the chicken over medium-high, indirect heat (i.e. no coals or burners on directly under the bird), with the grill cover on, for approximately 1 1/4 hours or until the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F in the breast area and 180 degrees F in the thigh, or until the thigh juice runs clear when stabbed with a sharp knife. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.


Beer Butt Chicken
by Carl Bartlett, Jr.
This one has been a long time favorite

INGREDIENTS:
All you need for this delicious chicken recipe is:
1 3-4lb chicken
1 12 oz can of ice cold beer
Your favorite herbs and spices
An outdoor grill
A mirror
1-1/2 hours

DIRECTIONS
Set your grill on low to medium.
Prepare the chicken by rubbing with your favorite herbs and spices. (The chicken! Not yourself.) Lemon Pepper is one of my favorites.
Now here's the tricky part. Open the can of beer and take one swallow. This is the most important step, but not for the reason you think. I'll explain later.
Now stick the open can of beer up the chicken's . . . Place the open can of beer inside the chicken and set upright on the grill (the chicken, not yourself).
The chicken legs and can of beer will form a tripod.
I know you're getting a mental picture of this and laughing, aren't you? Quit laughing . . . this is serious cooking. (Yeah right--no cooking is serious, I'm serious.)
Now close the lid, talk, socialize and drink beer for an hour and a half. Hopefully you're not by yourself when you do this . . . talking that is. Don't talk to the chicken
Check on the chicken occasson . . . ocass . . . ocassi . . . now and then!
BBQ sauce, if you like, should be coated about the last 15 minutes.
Carefully remove the can of beer. Caveat: The can will be really HOT. I say that because you've been drinking beer for an hour and a half and may have forgotten it's been sitting on a hot grill. When you remove the can it will be almost full. Be careful and wear a glove . . . not a surgical glove.
Now sit in front of the mirror . . . you forgot about it, didn't you? Watch yourself smile when you taste what you just cooked.
REMINDER:
Back to that most important first step. OPEN THE CAN OF BEER AND TAKE A SWALLOW. Why? If you ever use this recipe and stick an unopened can of beer up a chicken�s . . . place an unopened can of beer inside the chicken, the top of your grill may need replacing. Beer Butt Chicken may become Rocket Chicken.
If beer is not aprop . . . approap . . . apropp . . . If you don't drink beer you can use various fruit juices too. The hot liquid helps cook the chicken from the inside and adds flavor.
Hope you enjoy my little recipe.

Bon appetite.

Cookin Carl

THE ORIGINAL BEER BUTT CHICKEN Recipe
Beer Butt Chicken Recipe courtesy of Grilling America, by Rick Brown (2003 ReganBooks).
(Rick Browne is also host of public television�s �Barbecue America�)

INGREDIENTS:
DRY RUB
1 tsp. brown sugar
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tsp. onion powder
1 tsp. savory or oregano
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 tsp. paprika
1 TBS. sea salt �ground
1 tsp. dry yellow mustard

BASTING SPRAY
1 cup apple cider
2 TBS. olive oil
2 TBS. balsamic vinegar
6 oz. warm beer

DIRECTIONS:
Cook large 4-5 pound chicken with indirect heat on a charcoal or gas grill.
Cooking time 1 1/4 � 2 hours.
Use a grill with lid large enough to cook a chicken standing upright.

Mix the rub in a small bowl until it�s well incorporated. Wash, dry and season the chicken generously inside and out with the rub. Work the mixture well into the skin and under the skin wherever possible. Place in medium bowl, cover and set aside at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes.

Using a 12-oz. an of your favorite beer, pour out half the contents into a spray bottle, add the cider, olive oil, vinegar and set aside. Take the beer can in one hand and insert it into the ChickCan
(The beverage can may be used alone, with the bird�s legs creating a pedestal)

OPTIONAL: You may add Worcestershire sauce, liquid smoke, minced garlic, onions, etc. to liquid. You can also use fruit juices, colas, or wine instead of beer.

Place the chicken over the ChickCAN rack and beer can and place on the grill over indirect heat. To prevent flare ups on the grill place the rack into a disposable aluminum pie pan and add 1/4 cup of water.
CAUTION: �Cook with indirect heat�! This method of cooking chicken does two things: first, it helps drain off the fat as the chicken cooks, second, the beverage steams the inside of the chicken, while the outside is cooked by the BBQ heat, making it the most moist bird you�ve ever laid yer eyes, or gums, on. Some people put a small potato or carrot in the neck opening of the chicken to keep the steam inside.

For Charcoal Grills: Place coals on one side of barbecue grill, cook chicken over the other side. Add 6-8 coals every 30 min.

For Multiple Burner Gas Grills: Turn gas to medium on one burner, place chicken over an unheated burner.
For oven use: Place in a disposable pie pan and add 1/4 cup of water. Cook at 350�.

Cook for 1 1/4- to 2 hours. During the cooking time spray the chicken all around with the basting spray several times. The chicken is done when it is dark golden brown and the internal temperature reaches 180o in the thigh. Carefully remove the bird on the ChickCAN rack, and place it on heatproof counter top to rest for 5-10 minutes. Remove the chicken from the beer can with tongs while holding the rack with an oven mitt.

WARNING That aluminum can, and the liquid in it, is very hot and can burn you.

Give the chicken one more spritz of the basting spray and then carve. Serve and enjoy!

Rick Browne guarantees that the odd-sounding, but incredibly easy-to-prepare beer butt chicken recipe will not only wow partygoers with its unique appearance, but with its lip-smacking, incredibly moist, and virtually unmatched flavor and texture.
�Nothing can top the flavor of Beer-Butt Chicken,� notes Browne, who has prepared the dish on national television for the Today Show and Regis and Kelly Live! receiving rave reviews from both Al Roker and Regis Philbin. �And nothing can top the looks on your guests� faces when you open that grill and show them beautifully browned chickens perched upon beer cans.�
Non-beer drinkers needn�t dismay. The recipe works just as well with virtually any type of NON-DIET beverage, including sodas and juices. The trick is to make sure that the can, inserted in the posterior end of the bird, is at least half-filled with liquid, which seasons and moistens the chicken with flavorful steam.
The beverage can may be used alone, with the bird�s legs creating a pedestal, but Browne recommends such clever devices as the ChickCAN which holds the beer can firmly in place and balances the chicken, preventing spills.
Savvy barbecuers use two tricks to make the beer butt chicken even better. First, they concoct a "rub" from their favorite spices to rub (hence the name) onto the skin of the bird not only for flavor but to give the final product a mahogany-like glow. A typical rub would contain brown sugar, garlic powder, sea salt, ground pepper, and usually a green herb (thyme, oregano, or summer savory, etc.). Second, Que Masters make up a "spray" to keep the bird moist, applying it 2-3 times with a spray bottle during the cooking period. A good basic spray includes beer (remember you only need 1/2 can inside the bird), olive oil, vinegar, and apple juice. A few sprays while the bird is having his final sauna and the skin will be tender, moist and delicious.
Browne was the first chef to prepare Beer-Butt Chicken on national television, and has prepared it hundreds of times for conventions, the media, festivals, and, of course, dinner parties. It NEVER fails to elicit oohs and aahs � and win the �best-tasting chicken� competition hands down.


Billy�s Beer Butt Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
� 1 - 4 Lb. Fryer Chicken
� 3/4 Can of Beer
� Cavender's Greek Seasoning or Tony Chacherez Cajun Seasoning
� Vegetable Oil
� Non-stick Cooking Spray

DIRECTIONS
Rinse chicken and remove gizzard, neck, etc. Sprinkle the chicken, inside and out, heavily with seasonings. Spray beer can with non-stick cooking spray. Put chicken on top of beer and set on grill using indirect heat for 1 hour. Rub on some vegetable oil and finish cooking until browned all over (an additional 20 - 30 minutes), AND juices run clear. Total time on the grill is about 1 1/2 hours.
Comments:
Using a 2 burner gas grill have one side burning on high and the other side not burning and put the chicken on the cold side to cook. On a charcoal grill slide the hot coals to one side and put chick on the cold site. Enjoy!


Spicy Mustard Herb Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (4 pound) whole chicken
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
� 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
� 1 tablespoon fresh chives, finely chopped
� 4 oz of spicy mustard (horseradish is a winner)
� 1 12 or 16oz beer about � full


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat and smoke using your favorite wood.
Rinse chicken inside and out. Pat dry. Loosen skin around the breast area.
Place the mix spices/herbs together and place half under the skin and the other half inside the chicken.
Put the spicy mustard in the beer can along with as much of the beer as possible.
Place chicken over the beer can
Cook chicken with smoke for 4 hours or until juices run clear when poked with a fork.


Bar-B-Que Beer Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (4 pound) whole chicken
� 1 Bottle of your favorite store bought or homemade Bar-B-Que sauce
� 1 12 or 16oz beer about � full


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat and smoke using your favorite wood.
Rinse chicken inside and out. Pat dry. Loosen skin around the breast area.
Swab the chicken both inside and out with your Bar-B-Que sauce.
Place chicken over the beer can
Cook chicken with smoke for 4 hours or until juices run clear when poked with a fork.


Drunkest Chick at the Bar-B-Que

This is really about how drunk you can get the missus!
INGREDIENTS:
1 (4-pound) whole chicken
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons of your favorite dry spice rub
1 tablespoon seasoned salt
1 teaspoon or more cayenne pepper (optional)
1 can beer
1 or 2 shots of your favorite Kentucky Bourbon
DIRECTIONS:
Wash and pat dry the chicken then rub down liberally with any spices you may have within arms reach. Open beer can and take several gulps (make them big gulps so that the can is half full). Then pour in the Bourbon and then have a drink for yourself. Place beer can on a solid surface. Grabbing a chicken leg in each hand, plunk the bird cavity over the beer can. Transfer the bird-on-a-can to your grill and place in the center of the grate, balancing the bird on its 2 legs and the can like a tripod.
Cook the chicken over medium-high, indirect heat (i.e. no coals or burners on directly under the bird), with the grill cover on, for approximately 1 1/4 hours or until the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F in the breast area and 180 degrees F in the thigh, or until the thigh juice runs clear when stabbed with a sharp knife. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.
You should taste the sweet flavor of the bourbon (I use Jack) as it has permeated throughout the chicken and given it that special taste.


Bar-B-Que Pop Chicken
INGREDIENTS:
� 1 (4 pound) whole chicken
� 1 Bottle of your favorite store bought or homemade Bar-B-Que sauce (try some of the Chipotle raspberry sauces which are my favorite)
� 1 12 or 16oz Orange soda, Ginger Ale, Sprite or 7-UP about � full


DIRECTIONS:
Preheat an outdoor grill for low heat and smoke using your favorite wood.
Rinse chicken inside and out. Pat dry. Loosen skin around the breast area.
Swab the chicken both inside and out with your Bar-B-Que sauce.
Place chicken over the the half full soda can
Cook chicken with smoke for 4 hours or until juices run clear when poked with a fork.


Smoking Chicken

INGREDIENTS:
1 (4-pound) whole chicken
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons of your favorite dry spice rub
1 can beer
1 ounce of liquid smoke (There are different types out there. Some are very strong, so exercise caution in choosing which one you use)
DIRECTIONS:
Remove neck and giblets from chicken and discard. Rinse chicken inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Rub chicken lightly with oil then rub inside and out with salt, pepper and dry rub. Set aside.
Open beer can and take several gulps (make them big gulps so that the can is half full). Pour the liquid smoke in with the remaining the beer. Place beer can on a solid surface. Grabbing a chicken leg in each hand, plunk the bird cavity over the beer can. Transfer the bird-on-a-can to your grill and place in the center of the grate, balancing the bird on its 2 legs and the can like a tripod.
Cook the chicken over medium-high, indirect heat (i.e. no coals or burners on directly under the bird), with the grill cover on, for approximately 1 1/4 hours or until the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F in the breast area and 180 degrees F in the thigh, or until the thigh juice runs clear when stabbed with a sharp knife. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.


Sweet Mother of BigBird

INGREDIENTS:
1 (4-pound) whole chicken
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons of your favorite dry spice rub
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 beer or soda can
8 ounces Orange Juice or Cranberry Juice
DIRECTIONS:
Remove neck and giblets from chicken and discard. Rinse chicken inside and out, and pat dry with paper towels. Rub chicken lightly with oil then rub inside and out with salt, pepper, brown sugar and dry rub. Set aside.
Open beer can and take several gulps (make them big gulps so that you empty the can). Pour the orange juice or cranberry juice in the empty beer can. Place beer can on a solid surface. Grabbing a chicken leg in each hand, plunk the bird cavity over the beer can. Transfer the bird-on-a-can to your grill and place in the center of the grate, balancing the bird on its 2 legs and the can like a tripod.
Cook the chicken over medium-high, indirect heat (i.e. no coals or burners on directly under the bird), with the grill cover on, for approximately 1 1/4 hours or until the internal temperature registers 165 degrees F in the breast area and 180 degrees F in the thigh, or until the thigh juice runs clear when stabbed with a sharp knife. Remove from grill and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.


Pork Loin Roast
This recipe is probably my all time favorite. It doesn�t utilize a chicken nor does it include beer unless you are drinking it. But I felt the need to include it in this list of recipes. Read the entire recipe prior to starting. I will usually cook up about 4 of these things in a big roasting pan. Don�t let them get dried out. Enjoy! Feel free to alter any part of this recipe, just email me and let me know how it goes. I always like to alter my recipes to see what may come of them. You can prepare this pork loin ahead of time and take it camping with you then, place it on the grill or in a Dutch oven to cook it. Remember low heat equals tender meat and don�t let it become dried out.
INGREDIENTS:
1 or more whole pork loins, I have found that the bigger you get the better as you will figure out when you prepare yours
1 cup olive oil
1 cup barbecue rub (I use Obie-Cues, which can be found online or if you live in the DFW metroplex, you can get it at Trader�s Village)
1 big can crushed pineapple
1 big can diced tomatoes or Rotel
2 or more bunches of green onions (cut them in half, not diced, that way they are longer)
1 large sliced white onion
1 large green pepper sliced
6 whole jalapeno peppers sliced
� cup minced garlic (ain�t no such thing as too much garlic)
1 roll of cotton fiber string/twine
1 package of bacon
1 package flour tortillas
1 bottle of pineapple juice or apple juice or tomato juice (the choice is all yours)

DIRECTIONS:
To prepare the pork loin for slow roasting you will first wash and pat it dry. Then you will cut the loin right down the middle, long ways. You will then coat it with olive oil. After this is done, you will brown the two halves. I used a great big Texas cowboy skillet (mine is made from an old plow disk that has had a piece of steel welded to conceal the center hole and has then had horse shoes welded to the sides as grips/handles) resting over a propane burner. Once the pork loin is browned, I will slice in down the middle again BUT NOT ALL THE WAY THROUGH. Then I will slice to the left and right of that slice. Now at this point you should have each half of your pork loin opened like a book. You will then pat down both sides of the loin with the barbecue rub and then stuff them with all of the green onions, white onions, jalapeno peppers, minced garlic and green peppers. Now fold that pork loin up and put the two original halves back together the best you can. Now utilizing the twine tie the loin back together. Once the pork loin is tied together wrap it with the bacon, tucking the bacon under the twine so it will stay in place. Now place the pork loin in a deep pan and then pour on the diced tomatoes then cover them with the crushed pineapple, then cover it with foil. You are now ready to slow roast the pork loin in a smoker or in the oven. Use a low heat about 225 degrees and roast until tender, the time it takes will depend upon how big a pork loin you use. (you do not want the pork loin to get dried out so check it often as it cooks, add water, pineapple juice, tomato juice or apple juice if it appears that the juice is evaporating too fast) This will be one of the best meals you have even eaten, I can assure you of that. After the pork comes out of the oven, it will be so tender that you can break it apart with a spoon and serve it on flour tortillas.

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