quote:
quote:
Originally posted by Qnorth:
I've always just used a pyrex baking pan. Pour the almonds in, add spice, add a little butter to make everything stick, and smoke for an hour or two. Stir maybe once or twice.
Interesting, in your pan, do you have them all on top of each other (as you would cook a macaroni in the oven), or just in one layer ?


Sorry, I missed your question. I usually just pour them in the pyrex pan, not too deep but not worrying too much about the depth. As long as you stir a couple times, they will all get the smoke.
Have one of those metal woks w/ the holes too. Tried Pags recipe & placed them in the wok & worked fine for me.

Turned out very good, the wife & my mom keep saying they're addicting! Seems like less salt than the store-bought "smokehouse" almonds, which is not a bad thing IMO.

The seasoning kind of clumped up on the almonds, but that's my fault for not reading directions closely. Mixed up all ing. for seasoning before tossing in almonds. Taste's an A. Appearance is more like a C, C-. Oh well, just gives me an excuse to make some more Wink
Pags
kudos on the smoked almonds. Both freezers are full of cooked meat. The wife says wait a while to make more freezer space, before cooking any more. So with nothing to cook I tried your almonds with some home made BBQ rub and a litte red pepper for flavor. You have a most excellent idea here.
Thanks
Thanks. I just adjusted recipes from here and the internet to come up with the one I use. Credits to a lot of folks.
Target sells raw unsalted almonds in 2# jars for $9.99. That's a little pricier than some of the other sources mentioned, but for me it's worth it because Target is so convenient. They are in the grocery section of my local Super Target, across from the crackers, I think.
I just completed a "shootout" article on cold smoking, and compared a DIY soldering iron smoker, a hand held food smoker called The Smoking Gun, and a Cookshack.

I smoke a lot of almonds too, and recently I've found cold smoking gives a better taste. I use two recipes. One is similar to what Pags posted, and that's what I used for the test. The other is loaded with honey and maple syrup.

I have had trouble with the latter recipe in hot smoking. The nuts tend to caramelize and can get a little nasty tasting with the char. With cold smoking plain for about 20 hours they are mild but clearly smoked, and then the gooey stuff can be added and cooked in the Cookshack at 225 for a couple of hours and come out clean and tasting perfect. The recipe I used was more of a test against other equipment because those can be hot smoked easily.

What I found was that the soldering iron smoker gimmicks work just fine if 1) your food absorbs smoke in 2 hours or so, or you can let it go as long as you like if 2) you don't mind spending a small fortune on wood chips. The Cookshack is a bit of a pain with the ice and all, but the economy is unprecedented. I was able to hold it at 72 degrees.

The hand held Smoking Gun is a very cool gadget. It's not good for anything but short term flavoring, but for putting a smoke flavor on anything from shellfish to a salad it works great.

I get my almonds at Costco, $10 for 3 lbs.

Here's the article if you'd like more details.
Great article LCNSac. Read all three techniques and viewed both slideshows. Enjoyable reading.

Since you've got a lot of experience smoking almonds, do you have a favorite recipe you'd like to share with us?
I'll be glad to post both recipes, but tonight I'm looking at some minor revisions, based on the cold smoking. I'll post when it's done.

In the meantime, Pags, here's a real find, and you can get it at the Folsom Outlet Mall at the kitchen store. Fits the Cookshack like a glove. $10.

Thanks. Looks like it would work well with chicken wings too.

I just did 7.5 lbs. of almonds, 5 lbs using the recipe I've used but substituted Yoshida Teriyaki for the Worcestershire and 2.5 lbs using TN Q's recipe with a little pecan rub on the maple syrup instead of the chicken rub. Put the maple almonds into the oven without smoking. Both turned out very good. As suspected, my daughter and granddaughter really loved TN Q's recipe. I should have used a little Pam on the cookie sheets holding the maple covered almonds. They really stuck fast(like cement) even though the cookie sheets were non stick. By popular request, some of the smoked almonds are heading to Chicago.

WinCo just raised the price of almonds again to $3.88/lb from $2.88 originally and the almonds seem smaller, so it looks like Costco next time as suggested by Donna.
I have a friend who grows almonds in the North Valley, and he told me the market price was cut by almost 40% per last year. We've seen no decrease at the retail level. Someone's coming out and it's not the growers or the consumers.
Pags, glad to hear the fam enjoyed the maple almonds. I suspected that standard cookie sheet use might be problematic; it's hard to predict how sugar and non-stick products will interact. I'm working on 3 pounds each of pecans and almonds using my spicy maple recipe on the Frogmats today; folks around here love 'em.

DB
quote:
Originally posted by LCNSac:
I'll be glad to post both recipes, but tonight I'm looking at some minor revisions, based on the cold smoking. I'll post when it's done.

In the meantime, Pags, here's a real find, and you can get it at the Folsom Outlet Mall at the kitchen store. Fits the Cookshack like a glove. $10.



What is this actually called? Looking for something like it, but don't have a clue what it is called to see if I can find one on-line or one locally? Thanks for the help.
Is there an advantage using a colander/steamer/strainer in the process of smoking nuts? Wouldn't this create an increased mass; thus taking much longer for the heat to penetrate to the 'center' nuts? Part of the process of smoking is thoroughly heating the nut and partially drying for that increased crunch and concentration of flavors. Seems to me it would require frequent stirring of product to ensure relatively even exposure; definately not recommended if there are any sugars in the coating.
Last edited by tnq
quote:
Originally posted by TN Q:
Is there an advantage using a colander/steamer/strainer in the process of smoking nuts? Wouldn't this create an increased mass; thus taking much longer for the heat to penetrate to the 'center' nuts?


Instead of laying them on a solid sheet, putting them on a rack with fine netting will allow the smoke/heat to penetrate all sides. You don't have to use one like the picture (with the curved sides)

there's a product, like a silpat, that is basically a flexible rack.
quote:
Originally posted by SmokinOkie:
Instead of laying them on a solid sheet, putting them on a rack with fine netting will allow the smoke/heat to penetrate all sides. You don't have to use one like the picture (with the curved sides)

there's a product, like a silpat, that is basically a flexible rack.


Agreed 100%. However, image provided appears to show a mass of nuts that are not in a single layer. If you're layering, the use of these types of accessories would not be as efficient as using a flat surface for smoking nuts. Silicon screening and mats do work great for for this and many other applications.

DB
I agree. I've tried every combination and the single layer works best. The problem is capacity with the Smokette.

The nuts in the picture are untreated, and it does require stirring once or twice during the smoking process. When using sugars you can apply the sugars to the smoked raw nuts, and use the oven or even a grill to finish. For smaller quantities the Smokette is fine, but I find cold (best) or hot smoking the untreated nuts first produces a more buttery flavor.

I also do lots of smoked shrimp/prawns. I haven't tried it yet, but I'd think the basket would work well there too.
It would work well with chicken wings also.

For almonds, I use 4 cookie sheets, single layer the nuts for the most part since I do jam them onto the sheets. I can get 1.5 lbs of almonds on each cookie sheet, therefore, total of 6 lbs. in my Elite. I place two of the cookie sheets on the grills sitting on top of the side support slots, and then insert the lips of two more cookie sheets right into the side support slots(you'll need two medium size cookie sheets that fit perfectly). All the almonds get plenty of smoke, but I do turn them half way through the smoke.
Last edited by pags
Ya know, I started this thread back in mid August and it's amazing to see that something as simple as smoked almonds has drawn so much attention. It just goes to show how popular Cookshack and this forum actually are!

As for trays to smoke almonds on... I use Hefty EZ Foil Meat Grill Pans with the perforated bottom. I purchase them at my local grocery store for about $2.99 per pack of two. They work great and actually wash up nice for repeated use.

As for the smoked almonds.... I wouldn't do them if I were you. I recently had to join Smoked Almonds Anonymous. Every time I walked by the bag on the counter, I had to stop and grab a handfull. I guess I'll have to attend extra meetings this week though, cause I have six pounds waiting to hit the 025 in the morning!

Later All!
Here are two recipes that have worked well for me over the years. One is honey-based and sweet and the other is sugar free.

Martha's Jacked Up Honey Roasted Almonds

3 lbs. (or 8 cups) uncooked, untreated natural almonds –
6 oz honey
½ cup BROWN sugar
½ cup melted butter
1 tsp salt
¾ - 1 tsp cayenne depending on your taste preference
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 cup real Maple Syrup (don’t use artificial. Spend the money for the real stuff—it’s the only thing that works)
1-cup Jack Daniels bourbon (use any bourbon, but it should have some kick to it. Wild Turkey is a good alternative)

Garlic Smoked Sugar Free Almonds
3 cups or 1.25 lbs. natural, untreated almonds
1 egg white or ¼ cup Egg Beaters (an adhesive for the spices, no flavor is added)
2 tsp garlic powder
2 tsp celery salt
1 tblsp sea salt
½ tsp liquid smoke

I've been doing some experimenting, and found that cold smoking does produce a slightly better taste--more buttery. But, I'm not sure it's practical for most people. If interested, here a step by step tutorial I published adapting both recipes to cold smoking if desired.
Now that first recipe looks like my type of almonds. Love the Jack. I bought a bottle of Gentleman Jack and brought it to last Saturday's Christmas party. Three of my buddies and I polished it off. Very nice.

I'm definitely trying this recipe. I've got 3 lbs of raw almonds from Sam's just waiting. They're waiting for us to work through the 6 lbs. we just did. Some on the way to Chicago.
Merry Christmas everyone.

I've smoked almonds quite a few times and I use pizza screens. I sort of build a wall with aluminum aroumd the edge to keep the almonds on the screen set them on the existing racks and start smoking.

Works great!!
LNCSac. I just mixed up a 4 lb batch of your Martha's Jacked Up Honey Roasted Almonds, and they're sitting in the refrigerator as I write this. I'm leaving them in for 4 hours, then I'll bring them out and put them in my smoker.

The one that fell out of the bowl onto the counter tasted delicious wet, unsmoked and unroasted. Looking forward to the finished product.

Figure I'll smoke them for about 3-4 hours at 200- 225*. I went to your sight and read all 3 parts associated with smoking almonds. Thanks. Very interesting.
As you would expect with the honey, syrup, and brown sugar, they turned out on the sweet side. The Jack Daniels flavor dissipated during the smoke, and they had little smoke flavoring. I don't know if the coating prevented smoke penetration or if the wine soaked, oak wood slats I got from a local winery were burned too quickly. I think wood chunks would impart more smoke to the almonds.

All in all, they were tasty. I just prefer the spicier, more garlicky, smoked flavored almonds. My daughter and grandkids loved them. After all is said, I ate about 30 of them last night. Pretty good.

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Now I'm wondering how the almonds would turn out with my recipe at the top of this thread and using Jack Daniels for the moisture either totally or 50/50 with the Worcestershire sauce. Sounds like another experiment.
Pags, I think your cook turned out about right. You should taste a light smoke, but not much. The bourbon does make a difference--you can tell if you eliminate it---but it doesn't taste like two fingers of Jack either!

They are very sweet, and in my mind best for the holidays. I'm with you on the taste preference, but people seem to prefer this one, especially women. Thanks for taking the time to share your results and observations--it's how we learn.

John
Thanks John. I'll make a couple lbs of them again in combination with another recipe. They're tasty, and like you said the female side of the family loves them.
I smoked 4 lbs of almonds yesterday using two recipes. The first 2 lbs I used the recipe I shared way at the top of this thread. The second two lbs. I used the same recipe but switched out the Worcestershire sauce with Jack Daniels.

After smoking the almonds, the Jack Daniels taste dissipates, and you can't detect it. They still have the smoke and garlic flavoring, but no Jack. I had my wife do a taste test, and she likes the Worcestershire version better. I think she's right.
I haven't tried Jack in the non-sweet version, nor have I tried your Worcestershire sauce recipe--and I shall. Thanks for the test results!
Hi everyone I am making up another batch of smoked almonds for Christmas gifts this year using Pags's recipe. I used to cover my racks with foil and poke holes in them which was a pain to keep them from falling off and it was easy to put a finger through the foil too. So this year I decided to look for something better. I went out and found a perfect pan for this at Target. Look for Kitchen essentials from Calphalon non stick bakeware 12 x 17 inch crisping pan. It has lots of little holes in it for the smoke to move through and it fits perfectly in the rack slots in my SM 025. I still spray them with some cooking spray so they clean up easy. They don't fit so tight that the smoke cant go around them so I reversed the pans as the front side has a little curve. I push one to the back of the smoker and let the door push the other one in just far enough so the smoke path for smoke around the pans is, around the back of one pan and the front of the other pan sort of like an S pattern.
I have two stainless mesh chef pans from Williams Sonoma and they work perfectly for the Almonds I smoke.
Sam's Club has raw Almonds, and I use Pags recipie with a little hot sauce added!!
best thing I have used for smoking nuts is Frogmats; nothing I've used is easier to clean either.
Pags,

Yes that is the pan and it does have a little lip around it. I suggest you just go to target and take a look at it. Its just enough to keep the nuts from sliding off. I just dumped a bunch of almonds on a pan and then gently shake it from side to side so they settle and form a layer one almond deep. The lip height is just about perfect if it was bigger it would keep the pans from sliding into the rack holders in the smoker. I don't stir the nuts halfway but After 2-3 hours I moved the top pan to the bottom position so they get even heat and smoke. I only do one 3 lb batch with 1.5 on each sheet. If I had the 5 slot rack holder I could do a double batch or more. Do you know if the 5 slot rack fits the Elite 025?


Here is another link to amazon you can zoom the picture and see it better.

http://www.amazon.com/Kitchen-...ng-Pan/dp/B003M3DPIG
Last edited by burntends 2
Very interesting. Thanks. I like the idea of not having to turn the almonds since the holes allow smoke to come up through the bottom of the pan. Guess it's the same principal with frog mats and woks. I like the frogmats too, but without the lip coupled with my clutziness, I'd spill them.

I've been using normal baking pans and turning the almonds halfway through the smoke. I slip 2 pans into the Cookshack Elite slots (the pan lips fit perfectly) and 2 on the grates sitting on top of the slots. I can do 4 pans that way. There's less than an inch between the pan in the slot and the grate sitting above it, but all the almonds get plenty of smoke. Seems the smoke just works it's way around all 4 pans.

Yesterday I jammed 8 lbs of almonds onto the 4 pans and smoked them for about 4 hrs at 235* with hickory. They turned out great cause I like them a little toasty. Nice smoke and garlic flavoring. We're sending a lb each along with a Christmas ornament to 7 families back in Chicago. Just letting everyone know we love them.

Including the almonds, ingredients, wood and electricity, I figure I'm doing the almonds at less than 1/3 the price I've seen online not counting shipping them to me.
Last edited by pags

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